Tsinghua, CEIBS for jobs in finance in China


lennier

All,

Which of the 2 schools would be more suited for someone looking for a job in finance (asset management/international private equity) on the mainland post MBA? The obvious choice here might be CEIBS - but Tsinghua, being in Beijing, and having the prestige of its heritage, should be more attractive on paper.

Does anyone know what the real situation is? More broadly speaking, do international firms bypass Tsinghua for CEIBS as the latter is ranked well and much more visible?

All,

Which of the 2 schools would be more suited for someone looking for a job in finance (asset management/international private equity) on the mainland post MBA? The obvious choice here might be CEIBS - but Tsinghua, being in Beijing, and having the prestige of its heritage, should be more attractive on paper.

Does anyone know what the real situation is? More broadly speaking, do international firms bypass Tsinghua for CEIBS as the latter is ranked well and much more visible?
quote
lolipop

All,

Which of the 2 schools would be more suited for someone looking for a job in finance (asset management/international private equity) on the mainland post MBA? The obvious choice here might be CEIBS - but Tsinghua, being in Beijing, and having the prestige of its heritage, should be more attractive on paper.

Does anyone know what the real situation is? More broadly speaking, do international firms bypass Tsinghua for CEIBS as the latter is ranked well and much more visible?


my answer would be neither if you dont speak Mandarin
For English speakers Insead and Hong Kong UST are the best universal choices in Asia.

<blockquote>All,

Which of the 2 schools would be more suited for someone looking for a job in finance (asset management/international private equity) on the mainland post MBA? The obvious choice here might be CEIBS - but Tsinghua, being in Beijing, and having the prestige of its heritage, should be more attractive on paper.

Does anyone know what the real situation is? More broadly speaking, do international firms bypass Tsinghua for CEIBS as the latter is ranked well and much more visible?</blockquote>

my answer would be neither if you dont speak Mandarin
For English speakers Insead and Hong Kong UST are the best universal choices in Asia.
quote
lennier

agreed. and if i am a mandarin speaker?

agreed. and if i am a mandarin speaker?
quote
lolipop

agreed. and if i am a mandarin speaker?


i would go for Tsinghua, in the long run they will be the most prestigious B school in China.

<blockquote>agreed. and if i am a mandarin speaker?</blockquote>

i would go for Tsinghua, in the long run they will be the most prestigious B school in China.
quote
Nanchang

Just because you are an English speaker and go to Insead or HKUST does not guarantee you a good job in finance in Asia - yes if you are talking about going through the MBA recruitment process, you may have a better advantage at getting selected assuming you have good work experience and preferably someone inside the organization pushing your application. But experience already working in Asia, and preferably China will likely be the best indicator. Chinese is becoming more and more important for Hong Kong. If your goal is to work in China and do not speak Chinese, you should attempt to devote 3 years to learn this language. If you choose this route, you are not going the MBA recruitment process anyway, and are going the mid-sized PE or corporate finance route for a mid sized company that has cash to do M&A. If you are a foreigner, then it is likely they hired you for your ability to help on transactions outside China which require English. Still, the fluent Chinese is necessary to read the documents, newspaper stories, e-mails, and communicate to the accountants and lawyers in third tier cities, not to mention drinking with the tax collectors. The questions is whether you are willing to do that type of career rather than being recruited. Keep in mind, most westerners from INSEAD or HKUST don't get recruited for big banks or PE houses based in Asia. Westerners working in those firms put ther 10+ years in Europe or US first, then did the move.

Just because you are an English speaker and go to Insead or HKUST does not guarantee you a good job in finance in Asia - yes if you are talking about going through the MBA recruitment process, you may have a better advantage at getting selected assuming you have good work experience and preferably someone inside the organization pushing your application. But experience already working in Asia, and preferably China will likely be the best indicator. Chinese is becoming more and more important for Hong Kong. If your goal is to work in China and do not speak Chinese, you should attempt to devote 3 years to learn this language. If you choose this route, you are not going the MBA recruitment process anyway, and are going the mid-sized PE or corporate finance route for a mid sized company that has cash to do M&A. If you are a foreigner, then it is likely they hired you for your ability to help on transactions outside China which require English. Still, the fluent Chinese is necessary to read the documents, newspaper stories, e-mails, and communicate to the accountants and lawyers in third tier cities, not to mention drinking with the tax collectors. The questions is whether you are willing to do that type of career rather than being recruited. Keep in mind, most westerners from INSEAD or HKUST don't get recruited for big banks or PE houses based in Asia. Westerners working in those firms put ther 10+ years in Europe or US first, then did the move.
quote
Rhino

Hi nanchang,

Can you share a bit about your background?

Are you a non-chinese foreigner working in mainland china?

You seems to know a hard truth of obtaining a good job in mainland china.

I, myself, is a foreigner (non-chinese with no mandarin background at all) who wants to break-thru the chinese market in china.
Initially I want to apply to CEIBS, but from my research, the career service are not doing a good job in helping the foreigner.

Hi nanchang,

Can you share a bit about your background?

Are you a non-chinese foreigner working in mainland china?

You seems to know a hard truth of obtaining a good job in mainland china.

I, myself, is a foreigner (non-chinese with no mandarin background at all) who wants to break-thru the chinese market in china.
Initially I want to apply to CEIBS, but from my research, the career service are not doing a good job in helping the foreigner.
quote
D.jung

Just because you are an English speaker and go to Insead or HKUST does not guarantee you a good job in finance in Asia - yes if you are talking about going through the MBA recruitment process, you may have a better advantage at getting selected assuming you have good work experience and preferably someone inside the organization pushing your application. But experience already working in Asia, and preferably China will likely be the best indicator. Chinese is becoming more and more important for Hong Kong. If your goal is to work in China and do not speak Chinese, you should attempt to devote 3 years to learn this language. If you choose this route, you are not going the MBA recruitment process anyway, and are going the mid-sized PE or corporate finance route for a mid sized company that has cash to do M&A. If you are a foreigner, then it is likely they hired you for your ability to help on transactions outside China which require English. Still, the fluent Chinese is necessary to read the documents, newspaper stories, e-mails, and communicate to the accountants and lawyers in third tier cities, not to mention drinking with the tax collectors. The questions is whether you are willing to do that type of career rather than being recruited. Keep in mind, most westerners from INSEAD or HKUST don't get recruited for big banks or PE houses based in Asia. Westerners working in those firms put ther 10+ years in Europe or US first, then did the move.


some hard truth are written here by Nanchang. especially about knowing mandarin, and about foreigners, when hired by Asia based are usually being hired to deal with the business of thous companies in the English speaking world.
everybody seems to agree on the fact that you need to know mandarin to work in china - you can just search for mandarin in this forum, and see what i mean.

<blockquote>Just because you are an English speaker and go to Insead or HKUST does not guarantee you a good job in finance in Asia - yes if you are talking about going through the MBA recruitment process, you may have a better advantage at getting selected assuming you have good work experience and preferably someone inside the organization pushing your application. But experience already working in Asia, and preferably China will likely be the best indicator. Chinese is becoming more and more important for Hong Kong. If your goal is to work in China and do not speak Chinese, you should attempt to devote 3 years to learn this language. If you choose this route, you are not going the MBA recruitment process anyway, and are going the mid-sized PE or corporate finance route for a mid sized company that has cash to do M&A. If you are a foreigner, then it is likely they hired you for your ability to help on transactions outside China which require English. Still, the fluent Chinese is necessary to read the documents, newspaper stories, e-mails, and communicate to the accountants and lawyers in third tier cities, not to mention drinking with the tax collectors. The questions is whether you are willing to do that type of career rather than being recruited. Keep in mind, most westerners from INSEAD or HKUST don't get recruited for big banks or PE houses based in Asia. Westerners working in those firms put ther 10+ years in Europe or US first, then did the move. </blockquote>

some hard truth are written here by Nanchang. especially about knowing mandarin, and about foreigners, when hired by Asia based are usually being hired to deal with the business of thous companies in the English speaking world.
everybody seems to agree on the fact that you need to know mandarin to work in china - you can just search for mandarin in this forum, and see what i mean.
quote

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