SP Jain for an American?


What do you guys think of the SP Jain Global MBA program, especially for an entrepreneur from the US?

I like the fact that there are residencies in Dubai and Singapore - because I'd like to develop networks in these regions. My main goal in doing an MBA is to help me develop and hone a couple of business ideas that could be based in China, India, or somewhere in the mid-east.

Would the SP Jain program be more appropriate for this, than say, a more traditional entrepreneurial-focused program in the States like Stanford's or MIT's? Are there other options I should be considering? What about the INSEAD program?
What do you guys think of the SP Jain Global MBA program, especially for an entrepreneur from the US?

I like the fact that there are residencies in Dubai and Singapore - because I'd like to develop networks in these regions. My main goal in doing an MBA is to help me develop and hone a couple of business ideas that could be based in China, India, or somewhere in the mid-east.

Would the SP Jain program be more appropriate for this, than say, a more traditional entrepreneurial-focused program in the States like Stanford's or MIT's? Are there other options I should be considering? What about the INSEAD program?
quote
ralph
What about a globally-focused western program instead? You'll probably come away from a program (like INSEAD's) with better salary potential and more of an entrepreneurial focus than you would with the SP Jain program.

The SP Jain MBA caters to Indian and Chinese students who end up working in India/Southeast Asia and the mid-east. There are very few - if any - western students. I'm just not sure if they'd know what to do with you.

In terms of building networks in developing countries, many programs have opportunities for you to study or work in other countries. MIT's global entrepreneurship lab, for instance, hooks you up with entrepreneurs all over the world. Likewise, NYU Stern has 1-2 week courses intensive courses in places like India and China, among others.
What about a globally-focused western program instead? You'll probably come away from a program (like INSEAD's) with better salary potential and more of an entrepreneurial focus than you would with the SP Jain program.

The SP Jain MBA caters to Indian and Chinese students who end up working in India/Southeast Asia and the mid-east. There are very few - if any - western students. I'm just not sure if they'd know what to do with you.

In terms of building networks in developing countries, many programs have opportunities for you to study or work in other countries. MIT's global entrepreneurship lab, for instance, hooks you up with entrepreneurs all over the world. Likewise, NYU Stern has 1-2 week courses intensive courses in places like India and China, among others.
quote
Duncan
Look at the Babson masters in entrepreneurship which involves a semester in China and Europe.

SP Jain is 90 percent Indian. The Financial times ranking doesn't count Indians as SP Jain as being international students. It's like being at NYU in Paris: you would be networking with Indians at Jain the way you would be networking with east coast Americans in Paris.
Look at the Babson masters in entrepreneurship which involves a semester in China and Europe.

SP Jain is 90 percent Indian. The Financial times ranking doesn't count Indians as SP Jain as being international students. It's like being at NYU in Paris: you would be networking with Indians at Jain the way you would be networking with east coast Americans in Paris.
quote
ralph
Look at the Babson masters in entrepreneurship which involves a semester in China and Europe.

That's a good suggestion.

SP Jain is 90 percent Indian. The Financial times ranking doesn't count Indians as SP Jain as being international students.

That explains a lot: I was wondering why there was such a huge drop - in last year's ranking, the FT said that SP Jain's cohort was 100% international students, and now it's at 3%. They changed their definition of domestic students to include Indian students this year.
<blockquote>Look at the Babson masters in entrepreneurship which involves a semester in China and Europe.</blockquote>
That's a good suggestion.

<blockquote>SP Jain is 90 percent Indian. The Financial times ranking doesn't count Indians as SP Jain as being international students. </blockquote>
That explains a lot: I was wondering why there was such a huge drop - in last year's ranking, the FT said that SP Jain's cohort was 100% international students, and now it's at 3%. They changed their definition of domestic students to include Indian students this year.
quote
I think the program of which you are talking about is good for those who want to establish their businesses in Asian countries like India and china. Better way rather than doing S P Jain?s program go for Babson masters in entrepreneurship.
I think the program of which you are talking about is good for those who want to establish their businesses in Asian countries like India and china. Better way rather than doing S P Jain?s program go for Babson masters in entrepreneurship.
quote

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