MBA Programs for Supply Chain in Asia?


chang dk
Hello,

I was curious to see if anybody can recommend any MBA programs that focus in supply chain management in Asia?

It seems like all the good supply chain programs are in the US. I'm currently in Hong Kong, and would like to work in the region, so I don't want to study in the States.
Hello,

I was curious to see if anybody can recommend any MBA programs that focus in supply chain management in Asia?

It seems like all the good supply chain programs are in the US. I'm currently in Hong Kong, and would like to work in the region, so I don't want to study in the States.
quote
Duncan
Dubai is in Asia... http://www.find-mba.com/specializations/39/supply-chain-management
Dubai is in Asia... http://www.find-mba.com/specializations/39/supply-chain-management
quote
ezra
I think Duncan is pointing out that the SP Jain Global MBA program is a good option for supply chain management. That would be a good choice, especially considering the program's concentration in Global Logistics and Supply Chain Management (and Dubai would probably be a great place to go for a career in supply chain or logistics, in my opinion) but you might also want to consider more general MBA programs based on where you want to end up.

For example, LinkedIn says that people working in logistics or supply chain in Hong Kong predominantly went to that city's schools like the University of Hong Kong, CUHK, and HKUST. Likewise, in Singapore, MBA programs like NUS, Nanyang and INSEAD produce the most logistics/supply chain managers.
I think Duncan is pointing out that the SP Jain Global MBA program is a good option for supply chain management. That would be a good choice, especially considering the program's concentration in Global Logistics and Supply Chain Management (and Dubai would probably be a great place to go for a career in supply chain or logistics, in my opinion) but you might also want to consider more general MBA programs based on where you want to end up.

For example, LinkedIn says that people working in logistics or supply chain in Hong Kong predominantly went to that city's schools like the University of Hong Kong, CUHK, and HKUST. Likewise, in Singapore, MBA programs like NUS, Nanyang and INSEAD produce the most logistics/supply chain managers.
quote
chang dk
Thanks for the info. The HKUST MBA program looks really interesting - but I've been looking at the school's Center for Marketing and Supply Chain Management, but it doesn't seem to be very active.

Also, it seems like the University of Hong Kong has a relationship with Fudan on the mainland, and they offer some supply chain electives in Shanghai. So I think I may apply to this one.

How about comparing a general MBA program with a specialized MSc in supply chain? I understand that NUS offers a program along these lines.
Thanks for the info. The HKUST MBA program looks really interesting - but I've been looking at the school's Center for Marketing and Supply Chain Management, but it doesn't seem to be very active.

Also, it seems like the University of Hong Kong has a relationship with Fudan on the mainland, and they offer some supply chain electives in Shanghai. So I think I may apply to this one.

How about comparing a general MBA program with a specialized MSc in supply chain? I understand that NUS offers a program along these lines.
quote
ezra
I think that an MBA from the schools that you are talking about would hold more value among supply chain employers in the region. You'd also probably be with a more diverse cohort and have relatively better discussions and group interactions in class.

Also, since supply chain roles are becoming much more holistic (you're now dealing with marketing, operations, information technology departments, etc.) a general management degree would most likely give you a better understanding of all the pieces involved.
I think that an MBA from the schools that you are talking about would hold more value among supply chain employers in the region. You'd also probably be with a more diverse cohort and have relatively better discussions and group interactions in class.

Also, since supply chain roles are becoming much more holistic (you're now dealing with marketing, operations, information technology departments, etc.) a general management degree would most likely give you a better understanding of all the pieces involved.
quote
chang dk
Thanks for the info. I've decided to apply to the following programs:

HKUST MBA
CUHK
Nanyang
INSEAD

I've decided not to apply to any programs that have concentrations in supply chain management, because it seems like there are no good ones in Asia.
Thanks for the info. I've decided to apply to the following programs:

HKUST MBA
CUHK
Nanyang
INSEAD

I've decided not to apply to any programs that have concentrations in supply chain management, because it seems like there are no good ones in Asia.
quote
Duncan
Those are good choices. Probably Insead will be the weakest for specialisations, since the course is so short and have little time for electives.
Those are good choices. Probably Insead will be the weakest for specialisations, since the course is so short and have little time for electives.
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chang dk
I've eliminated INSEAD from my list of potential schools.

In other news I took the GMAT and scored a 700 even. Does this change the calculus or open new options? I was considering CEIBS but it's not ranked as highly as HKUST in the FT rankings.
I've eliminated INSEAD from my list of potential schools.

In other news I took the GMAT and scored a 700 even. Does this change the calculus or open new options? I was considering CEIBS but it's not ranked as highly as HKUST in the FT rankings.
quote
mba hipste...
CEIBS is a good school as well - its post-MBA salaries are generally in the HKUST range, but the alumni network is generally wider (read: more European) than most of the other China/Hong Kong programs.

So if you had any interest in transitioning out of Hong Kong at some point, CEIBS might be the better options.

Otherwise, regardless of the difference in rankings (which is has been closing, by the way) the cohorts of these two schools are of similar caliber - and your GMAT score is competitive at both. I say apply for the both of them and see if one gives you a better financial aid package.
CEIBS is a good school as well - its post-MBA salaries are generally in the HKUST range, but the alumni network is generally wider (read: more European) than most of the other China/Hong Kong programs.

So if you had any interest in transitioning out of Hong Kong at some point, CEIBS might be the better options.

Otherwise, regardless of the difference in rankings (which is has been closing, by the way) the cohorts of these two schools are of similar caliber - and your GMAT score is competitive at both. I say apply for the both of them and see if one gives you a better financial aid package.
quote
Razors Edg...
Good discussion here.

I think HKUST is a good program for supply chain. They don't have a supply chain/operations/logistics concentration - but there are some classes in supply chain management.

It's not clear if you're looking for a particular industry, but I think a lot of HKUST MBAs go into supply chain roles in manufacturing firms - Volkswagen, DuPont, 3M and BMW are all consistent recruiters.
Good discussion here.

I think HKUST is a good program for supply chain. They don't have a supply chain/operations/logistics concentration - but there are some classes in supply chain management.

It's not clear if you're looking for a particular industry, but I think a lot of HKUST MBAs go into supply chain roles in manufacturing firms - Volkswagen, DuPont, 3M and BMW are all consistent recruiters.
quote
ezra
Indeed. And interestingly, I was just talking to somebody who was working as a director of logistics for a freight company in the region - and he was saying that in and around Hong Kong, there's a increasing demand for hybrid roles that leverage knowledge of IT and information systems with operations and supply chain.

These roles are good for people who have backgrounds in IT, and who want to break into supply chain roles.
Indeed. And interestingly, I was just talking to somebody who was working as a director of logistics for a freight company in the region - and he was saying that in and around Hong Kong, there's a increasing demand for hybrid roles that leverage knowledge of IT and information systems with operations and supply chain.

These roles are good for people who have backgrounds in IT, and who want to break into supply chain roles.
quote
Razors Edg...
There's been so much negative press on the electronics and semicon industries in Asia (look at the Apple/Foxconn fiasco, for instance) that it makes me think that this sector in Asia is very poorly managed, and is ready for some good people to come in and lead (implementing the CSR components alone is going to be a nightmare!)

It's baffling that CEIBS, Tsinghua, etc. don't have more supply chain courses/specializations/research capacity.
There's been so much negative press on the electronics and semicon industries in Asia (look at the Apple/Foxconn fiasco, for instance) that it makes me think that this sector in Asia is very poorly managed, and is ready for some good people to come in and lead (implementing the CSR components alone is going to be a nightmare!)

It's baffling that CEIBS, Tsinghua, etc. don't have more supply chain courses/specializations/research capacity.
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chang dk
I agree - that's what's made this MBA search sort of tricky.

I keep hearing that SP Jain is the best school in the region for this, but I've also heard that the school doesn't attract the same level of students as CEIBS and HKUST.

But my thinking now is that I don't necessarily need a concentration in supply chain management in order to land a job, as long as I can get into a top tier school (my fingers are crossed for HKUST!)
I agree - that's what's made this MBA search sort of tricky.

I keep hearing that SP Jain is the best school in the region for this, but I've also heard that the school doesn't attract the same level of students as CEIBS and HKUST.

But my thinking now is that I don't necessarily need a concentration in supply chain management in order to land a job, as long as I can get into a top tier school (my fingers are crossed for HKUST!)
quote
Duncan
I think it's important to remember that the English language is a substantial filter when you look at China. There is a huge amount of work being done on the supply chain, but there's no reason for that to come through into English-language MBA programmes because of the division of labour between those who do, and do not, speak Chinese. Work in the supply chain requires a lot of collaboration, and that's not something that foreign MBA talent is needed for in China.

I think City Uni in HK is the only place where you'll find this in English, because they have their joint OSCM programme with UC Berkeley. http://www.cb.cityu.edu.hk/ms/mscoscm/
I think it's important to remember that the English language is a substantial filter when you look at China. There is a huge amount of work being done on the supply chain, but there's no reason for that to come through into English-language MBA programmes because of the division of labour between those who do, and do not, speak Chinese. Work in the supply chain requires a lot of collaboration, and that's not something that foreign MBA talent is needed for in China.

I think City Uni in HK is the only place where you'll find this in English, because they have their joint OSCM programme with UC Berkeley. http://www.cb.cityu.edu.hk/ms/mscoscm/
quote
A colleague told me about a friend of his who did his MBA at INSEAD, and is now working in a supply chain manager role for IBM in Singapore. I'm not sure that this is a truly representative sample, but it's good to be aware of!
A colleague told me about a friend of his who did his MBA at INSEAD, and is now working in a supply chain manager role for IBM in Singapore. I'm not sure that this is a truly representative sample, but it's good to be aware of!
quote
chang dk
Great, thanks Duncan for the link to the City University HK program - I'll look into it.

And thank you, Reckoning Force, for the info about your friend who is now working for IBM. Good stuff, unfortunately I decided not to apply to INSEAD because of its lack of focus, and with all the great programs in Hong Kong, I feel like I should just stay here...
Great, thanks Duncan for the link to the City University HK program - I'll look into it.

And thank you, Reckoning Force, for the info about your friend who is now working for IBM. Good stuff, unfortunately I decided not to apply to INSEAD because of its lack of focus, and with all the great programs in Hong Kong, I feel like I should just stay here...
quote
mba hipste...
I think City Uni in HK is the only place where you'll find this in English, because they have their joint OSCM programme with UC Berkeley.

That MSc program looks good. Also, it should be noted that CUHK has some China-specific supply chain courses in its MBA program (specifically in its "China Business" concentration.)

But yes, not knowing Mandarin is probably going to be an issue if you want to work on the mainland.
<blockquote>I think City Uni in HK is the only place where you'll find this in English, because they have their joint OSCM programme with UC Berkeley. </blockquote>
That MSc program looks good. Also, it should be noted that CUHK has some China-specific supply chain courses in its MBA program (specifically in its "China Business" concentration.)

But yes, not knowing Mandarin is probably going to be an issue if you want to work on the mainland.
quote
chang dk
I'm not clear on what value an MSc would hold over an MBA. I was under the impression that an MBA is better for jobs and career growth.
I'm not clear on what value an MSc would hold over an MBA. I was under the impression that an MBA is better for jobs and career growth.
quote
Duncan
Your question was "if anybody can recommend any MBA programs that focus in supply chain management in Asia". There are none. So you have the choice between an MSc in supply chain/operations or one of the regular MBAs. Depending on why SCM is your career goal, the MSc could be a better fit.
Your question was "if anybody can recommend any MBA programs that focus in supply chain management in Asia". There are none. So you have the choice between an MSc in supply chain/operations or one of the regular MBAs. Depending on why SCM is your career goal, the MSc could be a better fit.
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Razors Edg...
My advice is not to worry about the specialization. Just get into the best school you can and you'll get enough supply chain/operations/logistics experience in the core.

Then do what you can to meet people in the industries you want to work in, do an internship, etc.

I am not sure that you would need something intensively about supply chain to get a job in this field - unless the positions you're after require a high degree of technical knowledge.
My advice is not to worry about the specialization. Just get into the best school you can and you'll get enough supply chain/operations/logistics experience in the core.

Then do what you can to meet people in the industries you want to work in, do an internship, etc.

I am not sure that you would need something intensively about supply chain to get a job in this field - unless the positions you're after require a high degree of technical knowledge.
quote

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