MBA in Japan?


edu98

Hello,



I'm currently studying two degrees at the same time in Spain, I'm studying law and business administration. I'm almost finishing both of them so I was wondering If I could study a MBA in Japan (Because I would like to go there and live) without work experience but having two degrees with a GPA of 3, a medium japanese lvl (N4/3) and a good GMAT score. Most of MBAs require work experience but since I dont have, what other alternatives do I have to study a Master in Japan without having work experience. I've already searched some universities such as the International University of Japan but It says that work experience is mostly needed to have a succesful aplication. What can I do?



Thank you

[Edited by edu98 on Aug 09, 2021]

Hello,<br>
<br>
I'm currently studying two degrees at the same time in Spain, I'm studying law and business administration. I'm almost finishing both of them so I was wondering If I could study a MBA in Japan (Because I would like to go there and live) without work experience but having two degrees with a GPA of 3, a medium japanese lvl (N4/3) and a good GMAT score. Most of MBAs require work experience but since I dont have, what other alternatives do I have to study a Master in Japan without having work experience. I've already searched some universities such as the International University of Japan but It says that work experience is mostly needed to have a succesful aplication. What can I do?<br>
<br>
Thank you
quote
Duncan

Your inability to function in Japanese at a professional level is a bigger barrier. An MBA taught in English will not reduce that barrier. Therefore, you should improve your Japanese to the level needed to study in that language. See https://www.studyinjapan.go.jp/en/ 

Your inability to function in Japanese at a professional level is a bigger barrier. An MBA taught in English will not reduce that barrier. Therefore, you should improve your Japanese to the level needed to study in that language. See https://www.studyinjapan.go.jp/en/&nbsp;
quote
edu98

Your inability to function in Japanese at a professional level is a bigger barrier. An MBA taught in English will not reduce that barrier. Therefore, you should improve your Japanese to the level needed to study in that language. See https://www.studyinjapan.go.jp/en/ 



You are right, but apparently most of Japanese Universities hava Japanese classes at the same time that you are doing the MBA so after you finish the 2 years MBA, you are able to comunicate fluently and almost at native level I supose.

[quote]Your inability to function in Japanese at a professional level is a bigger barrier. An MBA taught in English will not reduce that barrier. Therefore, you should improve your Japanese to the level needed to study in that language. See https://www.studyinjapan.go.jp/en/&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br><br>You are right, but apparently most of Japanese Universities hava Japanese classes at the same time that you are doing the MBA so after you finish the 2 years MBA, you are able to comunicate fluently and almost at native level I supose.
quote
Duncan

That is surprising. Generally, students studying alongside an MBA in English make very modest improvements and end up around B2 level. They are often unable to write and speak at a professional level and rarely have a functional vocabulary. Studying in Japanese would be the most effective route. 

That is surprising. Generally, students studying alongside an MBA in English make very modest improvements and end up around B2 level. They are often unable to write and speak at a professional level and rarely have a functional vocabulary. Studying in Japanese would be the most effective route.&nbsp;
quote
Razors Edg...

Beyond the language barrier, I'd have a frank conversation with any school you are looking at and ask them about the placement statistics for international students who come to study there, especially those who don't have work experience.

Although I don't have much knowledge of the work environment in Japan, I get the feeling companies can be quite insular and difficult to get into for international grads, especially those who don't have a solid practical background or managerial experience. 

Beyond the language barrier, I'd have a frank conversation with any school you are looking at and ask them about the placement statistics for international students who come to study there, especially those who don't have work experience.<br><br>Although I don't have much knowledge of the work environment in Japan, I get the feeling companies can be quite insular and difficult to get into for international grads, especially those who don't have a solid practical background or managerial experience.&nbsp;<br>
quote

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