schulich in India


toby
Looks like Schulich Business School opened a new campus in India:

http://www.economist.com/whichmba/schulich-moves-east
Looks like Schulich Business School opened a new campus in India:

http://www.economist.com/whichmba/schulich-moves-east

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ralph
Interesting.

The article that blog post reference is also interesting - about the globalization of top business schools - with Insead leading the way in Singapore, and schools like Harvard and Chicago Booth following suit and creating partnerships with international programs like CEIBS.

The subtext in both these stories is that these Western schools are assuming "risk;" both in opening schools in foreign countries and also catering to less wealthy students. I hardly thing this is the case - even the Economist points out that the number of foreign students in Western programs is high (85% of the students in Europe's top 55 programs are not from Europe) and rising.

Aside from the short-term risk of not making the same tuition per student, this is actually great capitalism - the schools are bringing the goods directly to the consumers.
Interesting.

The article that blog post reference is also interesting - about the globalization of top business schools - with Insead leading the way in Singapore, and schools like Harvard and Chicago Booth following suit and creating partnerships with international programs like CEIBS.

The subtext in both these stories is that these Western schools are assuming "risk;" both in opening schools in foreign countries and also catering to less wealthy students. I hardly thing this is the case - even the Economist points out that the number of foreign students in Western programs is high (85% of the students in Europe's top 55 programs are not from Europe) and rising.

Aside from the short-term risk of not making the same tuition per student, this is actually great capitalism - the schools are bringing the goods directly to the consumers.
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toby
Yes, I also found that article interesting, so I'll post it here:

http://www.economist.com/node/18802722?story_id=18802722

I'm a little surprised too that this endeavour is considered a 'risk', to me it sounds like North American schools can monopolize the foreign education system. More money for them.
Yes, I also found that article interesting, so I'll post it here:

http://www.economist.com/node/18802722?story_id=18802722

I'm a little surprised too that this endeavour is considered a 'risk', to me it sounds like North American schools can monopolize the foreign education system. More money for them.


quote
ralph
I'm a little surprised too that this endeavour is considered a 'risk', to me it sounds like North American schools can monopolize the foreign education system. More money for them.


Seriously, the cost of opening campuses in developing countries must be peanuts compared to starting new ones locally. And getting in on the ground floor, so to speak, would really help entrepreneurial MBA programs set the agenda and potentially create some interesting program components (I'm thinking things like specializations like Islamic finance, etc.)

I don't really see the risk involved.
<blockquote>I'm a little surprised too that this endeavour is considered a 'risk', to me it sounds like North American schools can monopolize the foreign education system. More money for them.</blockquote>

Seriously, the cost of opening campuses in developing countries must be peanuts compared to starting new ones locally. And getting in on the ground floor, so to speak, would really help entrepreneurial MBA programs set the agenda and potentially create some interesting program components (I'm thinking things like specializations like Islamic finance, etc.)

I don't really see the risk involved.
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toby
Do you think it might have something to do with these North American schools feeling that their standards will be lowered? Cheaper tuition and lowered admissions requirements, perhaps? Schools like Shulich, Boston and Harvard have a reputation in America that might not be translated overseas in Asia. Either way, if there is a risk, I think it would be pretty minute.
Do you think it might have something to do with these North American schools feeling that their standards will be lowered? Cheaper tuition and lowered admissions requirements, perhaps? Schools like Shulich, Boston and Harvard have a reputation in America that might not be translated overseas in Asia. Either way, if there is a risk, I think it would be pretty minute.
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Can you help me decide between schulich India and Rutgers Business school, NJ for job prospects for international students post FT MBA
Can you help me decide between schulich India and Rutgers Business school, NJ for job prospects for international students post FT MBA
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