GMAT criteria for Wake forest


Hi,

I have a 620 GMAT with a 2+ yeasr of work-ex perience . Do you think i do stand a chance i have a 3.3 GPA and soem decent team lead experience in an international compnay.

Hi,

I have a 620 GMAT with a 2+ yeasr of work-ex perience . Do you think i do stand a chance i have a 3.3 GPA and soem decent team lead experience in an international compnay.
quote
lukeh

I don't know anything about that, but I have been to Wake Forest, so I know a little about the place. If you're still interested, pop a post on here - or send me a message - and I'll tell you what I do know.

I don't know anything about that, but I have been to Wake Forest, so I know a little about the place. If you're still interested, pop a post on here - or send me a message - and I'll tell you what I do know.
quote

That would be great lukeh,

Please tell me about your experiences and my chances ,

Warm regards,
Siddhartha

That would be great lukeh,

Please tell me about your experiences and my chances ,

Warm regards,
Siddhartha
quote
lukeh

I was there for a week, attending a conference at their Winston-Salem campus, having flown down there from Washington DC - a short trip of just over an hour. It's a private liberal arts college, and the faculty-student ratio for the whole college is 1:10, which is obviously really good. Most of the student I met were historians/language students, and I have to say the standard was generally high.

The campus is independent of the nearby town, set in several acres of woodland. Its a very pleasant place, every inch a picture-book American university. In fact in reminded me a little of UVA Charlottesville, though not as old and - because of the relative isolation - very few amenities beyond what's on campus. I suppose most students have cars for precisely this reason - it did feel a little isolated to me. Coming from Britain, it also felt a bit white, ie. I didn't see too many non-white faces there, which made it appear a tad homogenous and made me wonder whether it was a rather conservative place. However, I wouldn't want to go on record as saying anything too strong on that front - it may just as well have been pure circumstance, and my experience in this regard was in no way representative of the college as a whole or its ethos. I'm sure it is in no way discriminates on these grounds, but perhaps it does attract more students from certain backgrounds than others. Also, MBA programmes tend to be more diverse, attracting a greater range of students from all over the world. I see that at Wake Forest's Babcock School of Management, 21% of students are classified as being of foreign origin (according to the Economist). That's a little low compared with most top schools in Europe and the US.

I was there for a week, attending a conference at their Winston-Salem campus, having flown down there from Washington DC - a short trip of just over an hour. It's a private liberal arts college, and the faculty-student ratio for the whole college is 1:10, which is obviously really good. Most of the student I met were historians/language students, and I have to say the standard was generally high.

The campus is independent of the nearby town, set in several acres of woodland. Its a very pleasant place, every inch a picture-book American university. In fact in reminded me a little of UVA Charlottesville, though not as old and - because of the relative isolation - very few amenities beyond what's on campus. I suppose most students have cars for precisely this reason - it did feel a little isolated to me. Coming from Britain, it also felt a bit white, ie. I didn't see too many non-white faces there, which made it appear a tad homogenous and made me wonder whether it was a rather conservative place. However, I wouldn't want to go on record as saying anything too strong on that front - it may just as well have been pure circumstance, and my experience in this regard was in no way representative of the college as a whole or its ethos. I'm sure it is in no way discriminates on these grounds, but perhaps it does attract more students from certain backgrounds than others. Also, MBA programmes tend to be more diverse, attracting a greater range of students from all over the world. I see that at Wake Forest's Babcock School of Management, 21% of students are classified as being of foreign origin (according to the Economist). That's a little low compared with most top schools in Europe and the US.
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I agree it has the one of the lowest acceptance rates of foreign students. This could be due to many criterias.

Not many would have heard abiut this school. I only say this because i just heard about this school when i was shortlisting based on GMAT score . Mostly Indians /Asians tend to go for some selective schools based upon friends/ colleagues advice who are studying over there.Eg : Mays B School, Tippie . OSU are quite famous among indians.

I guess i could try over there if i feel confident about my chances there which as of now are slim.

Thanks,
lukeh for your time

Warm Regards,
Siddhartha

I agree it has the one of the lowest acceptance rates of foreign students. This could be due to many criterias.

Not many would have heard abiut this school. I only say this because i just heard about this school when i was shortlisting based on GMAT score . Mostly Indians /Asians tend to go for some selective schools based upon friends/ colleagues advice who are studying over there.Eg : Mays B School, Tippie . OSU are quite famous among indians.

I guess i could try over there if i feel confident about my chances there which as of now are slim.

Thanks,
lukeh for your time

Warm Regards,
Siddhartha
quote

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