UK visas


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Here's an interesting article about visa rules tightening in the UK for students outside the EU:

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/2/cecb4a6e-27bc-11e0-a327-00144feab49a,dwp_uuid=a6183a4e-287c-11e0-bfcc-00144feab49a.html#axzz1OrkeCA1R

Here's an interesting article about visa rules tightening in the UK for students outside the EU:

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/2/cecb4a6e-27bc-11e0-a327-00144feab49a,dwp_uuid=a6183a4e-287c-11e0-bfcc-00144feab49a.html#axzz1OrkeCA1R

quote
ralph

Thanks for sharing the article - interesting stuff.

Basically, the British government has just removed post-study work as a tier 1 visa option for immigrants. In the past, if you finished an MBA in the UK (and you were from somewhere else), you were eligible to stay and work for two years. Under the new system post-MBA grads have to go through the same system as everybody else (on the points system.)

Schools in the UK don't like this because it makes them less competitive with schools in other countries who bide for the same international students: Countries (like Canada, and the US with F-1 visas) offer students the opportunity to stay for a year or two without much hassle.

Interesting tidbit from the article: under the previous visa setup, 38,000 visas were issued in 2009. While substantial, I would have thought that this number would have been higher - especially if the new rules were used as a political tool.

Thing is, this article was written in January - before the new rules went into effect. I wonder if the schools' petitions did anything.

Does anybody know what the situation is there now?

Thanks for sharing the article - interesting stuff.

Basically, the British government has just removed post-study work as a tier 1 visa option for immigrants. In the past, if you finished an MBA in the UK (and you were from somewhere else), you were eligible to stay and work for two years. Under the new system post-MBA grads have to go through the same system as everybody else (on the points system.)

Schools in the UK don't like this because it makes them less competitive with schools in other countries who bide for the same international students: Countries (like Canada, and the US with F-1 visas) offer students the opportunity to stay for a year or two without much hassle.

Interesting tidbit from the article: under the previous visa setup, 38,000 visas were issued in 2009. While substantial, I would have thought that this number would have been higher - especially if the new rules were used as a political tool.

Thing is, this article was written in January - before the new rules went into effect. I wonder if the schools' petitions did anything.

Does anybody know what the situation is there now?
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