Is LSE' Executive Global Master in Management viewed as MBA?


Hello all,

I browsed MBA/EMBA program that I can do part-time and found LSE' Executive Global Master in Management. LSE website mentions that it is MBA alternative. Core courses are similar to MBA's core courses. However, it focuses more on academic approach.

LSE brand is very interesting. However, its degree is not called MBA. What is employer's view on this?

My goal is to switch career. I have been in engineering for a while, but I want to move to consulting (performance, industry expert, etc).

Thank you for advice ;-)
Hello all,

I browsed MBA/EMBA program that I can do part-time and found LSE' Executive Global Master in Management. LSE website mentions that it is MBA alternative. Core courses are similar to MBA's core courses. However, it focuses more on academic approach.

LSE brand is very interesting. However, its degree is not called MBA. What is employer's view on this?

My goal is to switch career. I have been in engineering for a while, but I want to move to consulting (performance, industry expert, etc).

Thank you for advice ;-)
quote
Duncan
Well, it is not an MBA. As you say it is a more scholarly and critical approach rather than an executive development programme. The LSE does not have the sort of career services and alumni network of a business school. For MBA level roles then take an MBA that places people into your target schools. These lightweight LSE courses, like Trium and the executive MScs, just don't have the content or create the momentum of more capacity-building business school courses.
Well, it is not an MBA. As you say it is a more scholarly and critical approach rather than an executive development programme. The LSE does not have the sort of career services and alumni network of a business school. For MBA level roles then take an MBA that places people into your target schools. These lightweight LSE courses, like Trium and the executive MScs, just don't have the content or create the momentum of more capacity-building business school courses.
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Thank you for advice Duncan. That is what I'm thinking, too. I know that LSE's courses are same as MBA core courses. But I may not have chance to explain that to future employers. However, I live in Asia, and LSE is a good brand here.
At my age (close to 35), EMBA is more realistic. I looked at Kellogg-HKUST and LBS-HKU-Columbia EMBA, but their fee are too expensive. I am not sure whether reasonable price programs, such as NUS/SMU/NTU in Singapore, will be well-recognized in other countries. It's big investment, so I need to consider many factors.
Thank you for advice Duncan. That is what I'm thinking, too. I know that LSE's courses are same as MBA core courses. But I may not have chance to explain that to future employers. However, I live in Asia, and LSE is a good brand here.
At my age (close to 35), EMBA is more realistic. I looked at Kellogg-HKUST and LBS-HKU-Columbia EMBA, but their fee are too expensive. I am not sure whether reasonable price programs, such as NUS/SMU/NTU in Singapore, will be well-recognized in other countries. It's big investment, so I need to consider many factors.
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donho199
When you have to explain it is not worth the investment.

Do a proper MBA, part-time is fine. Imperial College part-time MBA is amazing
When you have to explain it is not worth the investment.

Do a proper MBA, part-time is fine. Imperial College part-time MBA is amazing
quote
donho199
When you have to explain it is not worth the investment.

Do a proper MBA, part-time is fine. Imperial College part-time MBA is amazing
When you have to explain it is not worth the investment.

Do a proper MBA, part-time is fine. Imperial College part-time MBA is amazing
quote
Duncan
Respectfully, I think we will have to disagree about whether the EGMM is the same as an MBA curriculum. The EGMM has about half the core courses of, for example, the LBS EMBA (https://www.london.edu/programmes/masters-courses/executive-mba/programme-content/), and two of the LBS core courses (Finance and organisational development) are double modules. Most LBS EMBA will take six to eight electives (It can run a bit higher, especially for people like me who took an international exchange). Taken all together, I'd say the LBS EMBA is three times more learning than the LSE EGMM.

I quite understand that there are people who want a purely managerial overview for their executive education. For me, the most valuable parts of the MBA were the bit I would have otherwise avoided (the courses in financial accounting, operation management, cost accounting, decision science, management accounting, business ethics and macroeconomics). The EGMM skips those topics and brings in some more fashionable substitutes, but survey courses on innovation and FDI do not give the same life-long value as core MBA tools like operations management and macroeconomic analysis.
Respectfully, I think we will have to disagree about whether the EGMM is the same as an MBA curriculum. The EGMM has about half the core courses of, for example, the LBS EMBA (https://www.london.edu/programmes/masters-courses/executive-mba/programme-content/), and two of the LBS core courses (Finance and organisational development) are double modules. Most LBS EMBA will take six to eight electives (It can run a bit higher, especially for people like me who took an international exchange). Taken all together, I'd say the LBS EMBA is three times more learning than the LSE EGMM.

I quite understand that there are people who want a purely managerial overview for their executive education. For me, the most valuable parts of the MBA were the bit I would have otherwise avoided (the courses in financial accounting, operation management, cost accounting, decision science, management accounting, business ethics and macroeconomics). The EGMM skips those topics and brings in some more fashionable substitutes, but survey courses on innovation and FDI do not give the same life-long value as core MBA tools like operations management and macroeconomic analysis.
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Hi Donho. Thank you for input. Part-time program is good idea, too. I will check further.
Hi Duncan. Agree. I feel that the number of courses at LSE is fewer than business school's courses. I don't know why. Perhaps, an LSE course, such as econ, contains more contents than other's. Yes, I don't know whether I should study many contents that EGMIM provides.
Hi Donho. Thank you for input. Part-time program is good idea, too. I will check further.
Hi Duncan. Agree. I feel that the number of courses at LSE is fewer than business school's courses. I don't know why. Perhaps, an LSE course, such as econ, contains more contents than other's. Yes, I don't know whether I should study many contents that EGMIM provides.
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Duncan
The LSE is pretty much the only UK school I know that does not have a consistent Ects weighing for its degrees. But as far as I can see it is teaching one course in 30 to 35 hours of contact time, and that is pretty much in line with other British universities. Even if the courses it does teach were longer, the other core courses are electives are certainly absent.
The LSE is pretty much the only UK school I know that does not have a consistent Ects weighing for its degrees. But as far as I can see it is teaching one course in 30 to 35 hours of contact time, and that is pretty much in line with other British universities. Even if the courses it does teach were longer, the other core courses are electives are certainly absent.
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Duncan
A great comparison. Compare their Executive MPA with their full time MBA. Also very compressed.
A great comparison. Compare their Executive MPA with their full time MBA. Also very compressed.
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Hi all,

I did more research on programs. Among these 3 options, which one makes most sense for career change at mid 30s?

1) LSE EGMIM (I assume that you said no)
2) Part-time MBA. Based on my location, Singapore and Hong Kong schools may be possible. Are they well-reputable enough in other Asian countries? I live in a few Asian countries; people give weight to US/UK schools. I need to consider return on investment.
3) EMBA with good schools (IMD, Kellogg-HKUST, LBS, etc). They are very expensive options. Moreover, I don't know whether they serve my purpose.

Thank you for enlighten me
Hi all,

I did more research on programs. Among these 3 options, which one makes most sense for career change at mid 30s?

1) LSE EGMIM (I assume that you said no)
2) Part-time MBA. Based on my location, Singapore and Hong Kong schools may be possible. Are they well-reputable enough in other Asian countries? I live in a few Asian countries; people give weight to US/UK schools. I need to consider return on investment.
3) EMBA with good schools (IMD, Kellogg-HKUST, LBS, etc). They are very expensive options. Moreover, I don't know whether they serve my purpose.

Thank you for enlighten me
quote
Duncan
Let's come back to your goal. You want to move into consulting. For that you will need a deep general management education with strong analytical tools. Chicago, Purdue's IMM, LBS, Strathclyde all come to mind. Look for programmes where each class is taught over an extended period rather than in a block, so perhaps Manchester is good option? Part time courses at NUS, NTU, SMU etc could be excellent.
Let's come back to your goal. You want to move into consulting. For that you will need a deep general management education with strong analytical tools. Chicago, Purdue's IMM, LBS, Strathclyde all come to mind. Look for programmes where each class is taught over an extended period rather than in a block, so perhaps Manchester is good option? Part time courses at NUS, NTU, SMU etc could be excellent.
quote

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