England increasing fees for EU/EEA students


Duncan

Student Finance England has announced that EU and EEA residents will be charged international fees rather than home fees, and will lose their current right to student loans: https://www.euronews.com/2020/06/24/brexit-eu-students-will-be-charged-more-to-study-at-uk-universities-from-september-2021



This will have the biggest effect on pre-experience degrees, where home fees are often 50% to 60% of the international fees. At Durham, for example, MiM home fees are £13,800 rather than £23,500 for international students.



Home fees will apply to students starting in the next academic year and, as now, to people who pass the UK's three year requirement for habitual residency.


PS Devolved governments in Edinburgh, Cardiff and Belfast may follow England's lead.

[Edited by Duncan on Jun 25, 2020]

Student Finance England has announced that EU and EEA residents will be charged international fees rather than home fees, and will lose their current right to student loans: https://www.euronews.com/2020/06/24/brexit-eu-students-will-be-charged-more-to-study-at-uk-universities-from-september-2021 <br>
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This will have the biggest effect on pre-experience degrees, where home fees are often 50% to 60% of the international fees. At Durham, for example, MiM home fees are £13,800 rather than £23,500 for international students. <br>
<br>
Home fees will apply to students starting in the next academic year and, as now, to people who pass the UK's three year requirement for habitual residency. <br>
<br>PS Devolved governments in Edinburgh, Cardiff and Belfast may follow England's lead.
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mba hipste...

My feeling is that this will drive a lot of mainland EU MSc students to other places like Ireland (Smurfit's MSc Management is quite well positioned in this sense.)

Although I don't think top schools like LBS will see their enrollment affected too much, some of the lower ranked schools depend quite heavily on EU students for their Master's programs - if Imperial's MSc Management class profile is any indication of other schools in the UK, it's European students from outside the UK make up 36% of the class.

That will certainly be impacted but of course these programs' bread and butter comes from participants in other regions (South Asia, East Asia) so it could be worse. 

My feeling is that this will drive a lot of mainland EU MSc students to other places like Ireland (Smurfit's MSc Management is quite well positioned in this sense.)<br><br>Although I don't think top schools like LBS will see their enrollment affected too much, some of the lower ranked schools depend quite heavily on EU students for their Master's programs - if Imperial's MSc Management class profile is any indication of other schools in the UK, it's European students from outside the UK make up 36% of the class.<br><br>That will certainly be impacted but of course these programs' bread and butter comes from participants in other regions (South Asia, East Asia) so it could be worse.&nbsp;
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StuartBB

Top schools like London, Warwick and Imperial are also already quite expensive for EU students. I think the real impact will be the schools further from London who have a bigger gap between the home and non-EU fee, like Manchester and Edinburgh.

Top schools like London, Warwick and Imperial are also already quite expensive for EU students. I think the real impact will be the schools further from London who have a bigger gap between the home and non-EU fee, like Manchester and Edinburgh.
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George Pat...

That does not sound like a great idea. 
It may work for some MBAs because a good MBA will add incredible value to a career. And to a lesser extent in mim or mif. 

But for most other MScs it will not work

With the exception of the very very top MScs in places like oxbridge, a european student would rather do a free MSc in scandinavia and pay only the living expenses, saving the 25000. 

I am talking about degrees like applied sciences, arts, education, environmental, hospitality, humanities, journalism, natural sciences, social sciences etc.


I would expect UK universities to lose a lot of clientele in various fields.  

That does not sound like a great idea.&nbsp;<br>It may work for some MBAs because a good MBA will add incredible value to a career. And to a lesser extent in mim or mif.&nbsp;<br><br>But for most other MScs it will not work<br><br>With the exception of the very very top MScs in places like oxbridge, a european student would rather do a free MSc in scandinavia and pay only the living expenses, saving the 25000.&nbsp;<br><br>I am talking about degrees like applied sciences, arts, education, environmental, hospitality, humanities, journalism, natural sciences, social sciences etc.<br><br><br>I would expect UK universities to lose a lot of clientele in various fields.&nbsp;&nbsp;
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StuartBB

A MiM or MiF gives a bigger career acceleration than an MBA. It's an emotional judgement, and the applicant are generally not paying - it's their parents. In that context, you also need to remember that most non-EU fee payering applicants are admitted to UK universities, while most applicants to free Scandinavian degrees are not admitted. 



Even in the UK, it's much harder to get into a no-fee Scottish undergrad than into an more costly English one because of the higher demand. The ten major Scottish business schools are all in the 21 most selective in the UK. Four of the five most selective schools are in Scotland: it's easier to get into Warwick than into Glasgow Calidonian. Aberdeen is more selective than UCL and Manchester. Napier is more selective than Birmingham, Lancaster,  Leeds. the LSE and Loughborough.


I think that is also true for the high-quality schools on mainland Europe. Mannheim, for example, is much harder to get into than WHU. 

[Edited by StuartBB on Jun 30, 2020]

A MiM or MiF gives a bigger career acceleration than an MBA. It's an emotional judgement, and the applicant are generally not paying - it's their parents. In that context, you also need to remember that most non-EU fee payering applicants are admitted to UK universities, while most applicants to free Scandinavian degrees are not admitted.&nbsp;<br><br><br><br>Even in the UK, it's much harder to get into a no-fee Scottish undergrad than into an more costly English one because of the higher demand. The ten major Scottish business schools are all in the 21 most selective in the UK. Four of the five most selective schools are in Scotland: it's easier to get into Warwick than into Glasgow Calidonian. Aberdeen is more selective than UCL and Manchester. Napier is more selective than Birmingham, Lancaster,&nbsp; Leeds. the LSE and Loughborough.<br><br><br>I think that is also true for the high-quality schools on mainland Europe. Mannheim, for example, is much harder to get into than WHU.&nbsp;
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