Durham vs Edinburgh - transition


I'm looking to transition from a bit of a stale position focused on sales into a hopefully more challenging and stimulating entrepreneurial role in a younger, growing company. I've looked deeply into these two schools that I find appealing for several reasons.

Would either of these stand out for someone looking for a bit of a transition from sales into a more entrepreneurial role? Is any of the two more focused on latest trends, growth, entrepreneurial strategies, scaling up businesses, etc? Thanks

I'm looking to transition from a bit of a stale position focused on sales into a hopefully more challenging and stimulating entrepreneurial role in a younger, growing company. I've looked deeply into these two schools that I find appealing for several reasons.

Would either of these stand out for someone looking for a bit of a transition from sales into a more entrepreneurial role? Is any of the two more focused on latest trends, growth, entrepreneurial strategies, scaling up businesses, etc? Thanks
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Duncan

I don't think an MBA is an effective way to do that.

I don't think an MBA is an effective way to do that.
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Just as a note, my position is managerial, so not just a salesperson. What do you mean by your reply? Should I be focusing more on relevant work experience? Or perhaps a different type of degree? Thanks

Just as a note, my position is managerial, so not just a salesperson. What do you mean by your reply? Should I be focusing more on relevant work experience? Or perhaps a different type of degree? Thanks
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Duncan

British start-ups rarely hire many MBAs. MBAs are expensive to hire and have general management skills suited to larger organizations. The area around Durham, and the North East in general, is a relatively low-skill region with limited resources for start-ups with an international agenda.

Academic degrees are based on peer-reviewed research: data takes five or ten years to have an impact on teaching. There's little in an MBA, even in an MSc in entrepreneurship, that won't have been taught five years ago. Certainly, even then the core and electives of many business schools are pretty good at outlining entrepreneurship.

British start-ups rarely hire many MBAs. MBAs are expensive to hire and have general management skills suited to larger organizations. The area around Durham, and the North East in general, is a relatively low-skill region with limited resources for start-ups with an international agenda.

Academic degrees are based on peer-reviewed research: data takes five or ten years to have an impact on teaching. There's little in an MBA, even in an MSc in entrepreneurship, that won't have been taught five years ago. Certainly, even then the core and electives of many business schools are pretty good at outlining entrepreneurship.
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Thanks so much for taking the time to expand on this Duncan, much appreciated! Have a nice rest of the week.

Thanks so much for taking the time to expand on this Duncan, much appreciated! Have a nice rest of the week.
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