85 percent of business schools now accept the GRE


mba hipste...

Saw this from a study done by Kaplan test prep:

85 percent of business schools now accept the GRE as an alternative to the GMAT.

However, over half of the business school admissions people they surveyed said that just one in ten applicants took the GRE. They didn't do any surveys about why this is, though.

One interesting thing is that 18 percent of MBA programs surveyed said that those who submit GMAT scores have an advantage over people who submit GRE scores. That's not a huge number but enough to maybe make some applicants think twice about taking the GRE.

Here's their standard PR quote:

"The trendline for business schools that accept the GRE as an admissions alternative to the GMAT has been unmistakable over the past five years. What was once seen as an almost exotic admissions policy by business schools has become nearly ubiquitous,” said Brian Carlidge, executive director of pre-business and pre-graduate programs, Kaplan Test Prep.

“Our advice to prospective MBAs is if all the business schools they plan to apply to accept the GRE in addition to the GMAT, then contact those schools and find out if they have a preference for one exam over the other. We also advise students to take the GMAT if some of the schools to which they intend on applying do not accept the GRE. While the GRE is widely accepted, the only exam that is universally accepted is the GMAT.”

Saw this from a study done by Kaplan test prep:

85 percent of business schools now accept the GRE as an alternative to the GMAT.

However, over half of the business school admissions people they surveyed said that just one in ten applicants took the GRE. They didn't do any surveys about why this is, though.

One interesting thing is that 18 percent of MBA programs surveyed said that those who submit GMAT scores have an advantage over people who submit GRE scores. That's not a huge number but enough to maybe make some applicants think twice about taking the GRE.

Here's their standard PR quote:

"The trendline for business schools that accept the GRE as an admissions alternative to the GMAT has been unmistakable over the past five years. What was once seen as an almost exotic admissions policy by business schools has become nearly ubiquitous,” said Brian Carlidge, executive director of pre-business and pre-graduate programs, Kaplan Test Prep.

“Our advice to prospective MBAs is if all the business schools they plan to apply to accept the GRE in addition to the GMAT, then contact those schools and find out if they have a preference for one exam over the other. We also advise students to take the GMAT if some of the schools to which they intend on applying do not accept the GRE. While the GRE is widely accepted, the only exam that is universally accepted is the GMAT.”
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ezra

I wonder about how GMAT takers have an advantage over GRE takers, and whether those 18 percent of the programs that do give them an advantage make this clear on their application materials.

My sense is if that people knew that such a (relatively) large percentage of schools gave preference to GMAT scores, then fewer people would take the GRE.

I wonder about how GMAT takers have an advantage over GRE takers, and whether those 18 percent of the programs that do give them an advantage make this clear on their application materials.

My sense is if that people knew that such a (relatively) large percentage of schools gave preference to GMAT scores, then fewer people would take the GRE.
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Duncan

This is just more marketing fluff from the GRE. 85 percent of U.S. News & World Report Top 100 business schools accept the GRE: exactly the same figure as in 2012. If 18% are prepared to admit that GMAT-takers have an advantage, then that's amazing. It's brave to discourage applicants, but we all know the GMAT is a much more reliable test.

This is just more marketing fluff from the GRE. 85 percent of U.S. News & World Report Top 100 business schools accept the GRE: exactly the same figure as in 2012. If 18% are prepared to admit that GMAT-takers have an advantage, then that's amazing. It's brave to discourage applicants, but we all know the GMAT is a much more reliable test.
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I took the GRE last year when considering masters program and got a really good score (168v/163q, converts to 720 GMAT). But I decided to put off my studies until next year and since then I have decided to specifically do an MBA...

Problem is I took the GMAT and scored far lower than I would have liked (660.)

I am only considering US schools. My question is, should I submit my GRE score, submit my GMAT score? I would rather not take the GMAT again.

I took the GRE last year when considering masters program and got a really good score (168v/163q, converts to 720 GMAT). But I decided to put off my studies until next year and since then I have decided to specifically do an MBA...

Problem is I took the GMAT and scored far lower than I would have liked (660.)

I am only considering US schools. My question is, should I submit my GRE score, submit my GMAT score? I would rather not take the GMAT again.
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Duncan

This is exactly why schools know the GRE does not replace the GMAT. Its just a way of letting in candidates that are strong in other ways.

This is exactly why schools know the GRE does not replace the GMAT. Its just a way of letting in candidates that are strong in other ways.
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