Why are Canadian schools and SMU at the bottom of the FT msc management rankings for the employment?


Queens, UBC, Victoria, SMU, HEC Lausanne are almost at the bottom if you sort the schools according to the employment percentage? Why is this the case? In India, mostly everyone shares the opinion that getting a degree from a Canadian or a Singaporean school almost guarantees you a job in these countries. However, the rankings are telling a different story and in the 2018 rankings Bocconi is placed at the first position followed by Shanghai, IIM A, B and a university in Prague.
Queens, UBC, Victoria, SMU, HEC Lausanne are almost at the bottom if you sort the schools according to the employment percentage? Why is this the case? In India, mostly everyone shares the opinion that getting a degree from a Canadian or a Singaporean school almost guarantees you a job in these countries. However, the rankings are telling a different story and in the 2018 rankings Bocconi is placed at the first position followed by Shanghai, IIM A, B and a university in Prague.
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Duncan
I think your question shows the answer. These programs have large numbers of foreigners who don't have a local network or soft skills specific to the setting.
I think your question shows the answer. These programs have large numbers of foreigners who don't have a local network or soft skills specific to the setting.
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mba hipste...
In India, mostly everyone shares the opinion that getting a degree from a Canadian or a Singaporean school almost guarantees you a job in these countries.


This is an issue that happens a quite a bit when people conflate MBA programs with pre-experience master's programs. International job markets tend to value experienced professionals with a ranked MBA - foreign or not - but with unexperienced MSc grads less so.
[quote]In India, mostly everyone shares the opinion that getting a degree from a Canadian or a Singaporean school almost guarantees you a job in these countries.[/quote]

This is an issue that happens a quite a bit when people conflate MBA programs with pre-experience master's programs. International job markets tend to value experienced professionals with a ranked MBA - foreign or not - but with unexperienced MSc grads less so.
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Duncan
Yes, and I think that reflects that soft skills aid international mobility. Many of the most effective MiM degrees that two-year programmes aimed at people with undergrad degrees in business, and with lots of transferrable skills.

Duncan.
Yes, and I think that reflects that soft skills aid international mobility. Many of the most effective MiM degrees that two-year programmes aimed at people with undergrad degrees in business, and with lots of transferrable skills.

Duncan.
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Currently living and working in Toronto (migrated here from the Philippines and studied a US MBA as well before moving to Canada) so I can confirm one thing - there is no single degree (other than professional degrees like Law and Medicine) that will guarantee a job in Canada after graduation. To be honest, employers in Canada view degrees as more of a tick the box qualification to make sure you meet minimum requirements. Work experience (from North America or a developed country) trumps any MBA or MSc degree. Along with work experience, I agree with many here that soft skills (how you communicate and present yourself) would probably be more important than your degree. If you have trouble with English or starting and maintaining "small talk" before business meetings, it doesn't matter if you graduate with high grades from an elite school, your options are limited. It might not seem fair, but it makes sense. Think about it - you live in India - would any Indian employer really consider someone from say China unless the Chinese person is able to at least communicate effectively with the other Indian employees? Wouldn't the Indian employer just spare himself the headache and hire someone who can fit in easily with the team?
Currently living and working in Toronto (migrated here from the Philippines and studied a US MBA as well before moving to Canada) so I can confirm one thing - there is no single degree (other than professional degrees like Law and Medicine) that will guarantee a job in Canada after graduation. To be honest, employers in Canada view degrees as more of a tick the box qualification to make sure you meet minimum requirements. Work experience (from North America or a developed country) trumps any MBA or MSc degree. Along with work experience, I agree with many here that soft skills (how you communicate and present yourself) would probably be more important than your degree. If you have trouble with English or starting and maintaining "small talk" before business meetings, it doesn't matter if you graduate with high grades from an elite school, your options are limited. It might not seem fair, but it makes sense. Think about it - you live in India - would any Indian employer really consider someone from say China unless the Chinese person is able to at least communicate effectively with the other Indian employees? Wouldn't the Indian employer just spare himself the headache and hire someone who can fit in easily with the team?
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You are right. A lot of my friends tell me the same thing about Canada, Australia and NZ
Currently living and working in Toronto (migrated here from the Philippines and studied a US MBA as well before moving to Canada) so I can confirm one thing - there is no single degree (other than professional degrees like Law and Medicine) that will guarantee a job in Canada after graduation. To be honest, employers in Canada view degrees as more of a tick the box qualification to make sure you meet minimum requirements. Work experience (from North America or a developed country) trumps any MBA or MSc degree. Along with work experience, I agree with many here that soft skills (how you communicate and present yourself) would probably be more important than your degree. If you have trouble with English or starting and maintaining "small talk" before business meetings, it doesn't matter if you graduate with high grades from an elite school, your options are limited. It might not seem fair, but it makes sense. Think about it - you live in India - would any Indian employer really consider someone from say China unless the Chinese person is able to at least communicate effectively with the other Indian employees? Wouldn't the Indian employer just spare himself the headache and hire someone who can fit in easily with the team?
You are right. A lot of my friends tell me the same thing about Canada, Australia and NZ [quote]Currently living and working in Toronto (migrated here from the Philippines and studied a US MBA as well before moving to Canada) so I can confirm one thing - there is no single degree (other than professional degrees like Law and Medicine) that will guarantee a job in Canada after graduation. To be honest, employers in Canada view degrees as more of a tick the box qualification to make sure you meet minimum requirements. Work experience (from North America or a developed country) trumps any MBA or MSc degree. Along with work experience, I agree with many here that soft skills (how you communicate and present yourself) would probably be more important than your degree. If you have trouble with English or starting and maintaining "small talk" before business meetings, it doesn't matter if you graduate with high grades from an elite school, your options are limited. It might not seem fair, but it makes sense. Think about it - you live in India - would any Indian employer really consider someone from say China unless the Chinese person is able to at least communicate effectively with the other Indian employees? Wouldn't the Indian employer just spare himself the headache and hire someone who can fit in easily with the team?[/quote]
quote
You are right. A lot of my friends tell me the same thing about Canada, Australia and NZ
Currently living and working in Toronto (migrated here from the Philippines and studied a US MBA as well before moving to Canada) so I can confirm one thing - there is no single degree (other than professional degrees like Law and Medicine) that will guarantee a job in Canada after graduation. To be honest, employers in Canada view degrees as more of a tick the box qualification to make sure you meet minimum requirements. Work experience (from North America or a developed country) trumps any MBA or MSc degree. Along with work experience, I agree with many here that soft skills (how you communicate and present yourself) would probably be more important than your degree. If you have trouble with English or starting and maintaining "small talk" before business meetings, it doesn't matter if you graduate with high grades from an elite school, your options are limited. It might not seem fair, but it makes sense. Think about it - you live in India - would any Indian employer really consider someone from say China unless the Chinese person is able to at least communicate effectively with the other Indian employees? Wouldn't the Indian employer just spare himself the headache and hire someone who can fit in easily with the team?
You are right. A lot of my friends tell me the same thing about Canada, Australia and NZ [quote]Currently living and working in Toronto (migrated here from the Philippines and studied a US MBA as well before moving to Canada) so I can confirm one thing - there is no single degree (other than professional degrees like Law and Medicine) that will guarantee a job in Canada after graduation. To be honest, employers in Canada view degrees as more of a tick the box qualification to make sure you meet minimum requirements. Work experience (from North America or a developed country) trumps any MBA or MSc degree. Along with work experience, I agree with many here that soft skills (how you communicate and present yourself) would probably be more important than your degree. If you have trouble with English or starting and maintaining "small talk" before business meetings, it doesn't matter if you graduate with high grades from an elite school, your options are limited. It might not seem fair, but it makes sense. Think about it - you live in India - would any Indian employer really consider someone from say China unless the Chinese person is able to at least communicate effectively with the other Indian employees? Wouldn't the Indian employer just spare himself the headache and hire someone who can fit in easily with the team?[/quote]
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mba hipste...
The top-ranked MBA programs are extremely well positioned to place international graduates in Canadian firms.

From the most recent McGill career report, 94% of the class ended up in Canada. This is a program that recruits 60% international students.
The top-ranked MBA programs are extremely well positioned to place international graduates in Canadian firms.

From the most recent McGill career report, 94% of the class ended up in Canada. This is a program that recruits 60% international students.
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