Mini Executive MBA for mid-level experienced leader


aslamo

Looking for advice on doing a ‘mini’ Exec MBA, ideally 100% online. I can’t really justify the cost/benefit for a traditional EMBA; more specifically, I’m constrained by having to study online.

Me:
51 years old, live near London.
Business Studies degree from a low ranked UK university.

Work experience:
I'm IT Director level, working as a senior interim manager for large clients.

First 7-8 years of career was in supply chain management.

Then did 5 years IT/Supply chain consulting across Europe in my early 30s, including two years at PA Consulting, a fairly prestigious mid-large size management consultancy.

Worked closely during last 15 years with almost every business function plus worked in around 10 sectors so have good broad business knowledge, except corporate finance/strategy.

Worked in 5 FTSE100/Fortune 500 companies but also worked in a major charity plus public sector.

Goals:
Move back to a permanent role and aim to be a CIO (Chief Information Officer) of a medium sized firm within around 2 years.

Don't need to bump up salary drastically, already in £120-140k bracket.

Alumni and improving broader functional network would be useful but already know lots of senior leaders/headhunters in tech for career opportunities.


Other considerations:
Separately, I’m looking at doing a short course through Oxford Said on Executive Leadership but the areas I need to focus on are mainly strategy and finance and a refresh in marketing.

Ultimately, I need to improve my broader strategic awareness that will help demonstrate the required knowledge/gravitas as I move closer to the C-suite.

I would prefer to choose a course from a prestigious brand name university like Oxbridge, MIT, Stanford, Wharton etc.

Is there such a thing as a suitable mini EMBA?

I see Wharton do an online six month Management Development Program at just under $10k. I’m not sure how rigorous it looks and there’s no academic credit but is that so important for exec education?

Boston Questrom used to do a well thought of mini-MBA for Tech execs as part of a larger Digital Leadership programme but sadly it ceased last year and I can’t find any equivalents.

Any advice gratefully received.

Looking for advice on doing a ‘mini’ Exec MBA, ideally 100% online. I can’t really justify the cost/benefit for a traditional EMBA; more specifically, I’m constrained by having to study online.

Me:
51 years old, live near London.
Business Studies degree from a low ranked UK university.

Work experience:
I'm IT Director level, working as a senior interim manager for large clients.

First 7-8 years of career was in supply chain management.

Then did 5 years IT/Supply chain consulting across Europe in my early 30s, including two years at PA Consulting, a fairly prestigious mid-large size management consultancy.

Worked closely during last 15 years with almost every business function plus worked in around 10 sectors so have good broad business knowledge, except corporate finance/strategy.

Worked in 5 FTSE100/Fortune 500 companies but also worked in a major charity plus public sector.

Goals:
Move back to a permanent role and aim to be a CIO (Chief Information Officer) of a medium sized firm within around 2 years.

Don't need to bump up salary drastically, already in £120-140k bracket.

Alumni and improving broader functional network would be useful but already know lots of senior leaders/headhunters in tech for career opportunities.


Other considerations:
Separately, I’m looking at doing a short course through Oxford Said on Executive Leadership but the areas I need to focus on are mainly strategy and finance and a refresh in marketing.

Ultimately, I need to improve my broader strategic awareness that will help demonstrate the required knowledge/gravitas as I move closer to the C-suite.

I would prefer to choose a course from a prestigious brand name university like Oxbridge, MIT, Stanford, Wharton etc.

Is there such a thing as a suitable mini EMBA?

I see Wharton do an online six month Management Development Program at just under $10k. I’m not sure how rigorous it looks and there’s no academic credit but is that so important for exec education?

Boston Questrom used to do a well thought of mini-MBA for Tech execs as part of a larger Digital Leadership programme but sadly it ceased last year and I can’t find any equivalents.

Any advice gratefully received.
quote
Duncan

The issue is this: most non-degree options won't make you an alumnus of the university, and they will lack the rigour to give you more than functional vocabulary. The Boston University online MBA sounds like a good option: it would cost less than the Oxford diploma, and give you a much better education.  

There's little functional difference between a £27,000 Said diploma and a £432 Wharton Strategic Management Certificate. Both give you bragging rights, a diploma for the wall behind your desk. Degree alumni of those schools will know they are qualifications that are not really comparable in rigour to an MBA. If you simply need a superficial connection to a brand name, the Wharton certificate works. 

Right now, UK residents have a unique opportunity to get a free or almost-free degree through the apprenticeship scheme. For example, the Cass masters seems to meet many of your needs: https://www.cass.city.ac.uk/study/executive-education/degree-apprenticeships/executive-masters-in-leadership Cranfield, Henley, Manchester have similar options.

Another option would professional organisations' qualifications, like the ICAEW Business and Finance Professional (BFP) and the CIM's Certificate in Professional Marketing.

[Edited by Duncan on Jun 20, 2020]

The issue is this: most non-degree options won't make you an alumnus of the university, and they will lack the rigour to give you more than functional vocabulary. The Boston University online MBA sounds like a good option: it would cost less than the Oxford diploma, and give you a much better education.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br><br>There's little functional difference between a £27,000 Said diploma and a £432 Wharton Strategic Management Certificate. Both give you bragging rights, a diploma for the wall behind your desk. Degree alumni of those schools will know they are qualifications that are not really comparable in rigour to an MBA. If you simply need a superficial connection to a brand name, the Wharton certificate works.&nbsp;<br><br>Right now, UK residents have a unique opportunity to get a free or almost-free degree through the apprenticeship scheme. For example, the Cass masters seems to meet many of your needs:&nbsp;<a href="https://www.cass.city.ac.uk/study/executive-education/degree-apprenticeships/executive-masters-in-leadership">https://www.cass.city.ac.uk/study/executive-education/degree-apprenticeships/executive-masters-in-leadership</a>&nbsp;Cranfield, Henley, Manchester have similar options.<br><br>Another option would professional organisations' qualifications, like the&nbsp;ICAEW Business and Finance Professional (BFP) and the CIM's&nbsp;Certificate in Professional Marketing.
quote
aslamo

Thanks for that insight Duncan. Coincidentally I looked at a Cass masters in 2013 but in ‘Innovation, Creativity and Leadership.’ My career objectives were slightly different then. I didn’t apply as it was too difficult to fit around my work.


As I said in my previous email, I work as an interim manager so I get paid by the day by my clients. The Cass course you suggested looks like it is campus attendance based which might need perhaps 30-40 days attendance over 2 years. That would cost me around £30-40k lost earnings which isn’t feasible at the moment. Hence why I posted that I need a largely online course so I can study mainly in the evenings plus weekends. My work is also geographically dispersed so trying to study in the same place could be tricky.


The Said course I mentioned is an 8 week online course specifically in leadership, i.e. no finance, strategy etc. I accept it doesn’t compare to an MBA course at all but personally that course might suit my specific needs. I believe that leadership is best learnt by practice on the job and such a course would give me a framework and tools to apply that in real life experience.



I had looked at the CIM for digital marketing courses but hadn’t thought of something like ICAEW. I’m now thinking of using a specialist CIO career development/ coaching company that a friend just recommended. That might give me some more career specific insight into what type of course would be most appropriate as it seems there are several ways to approach this.


Thanks again.

[Edited by aslamo on Jun 20, 2020]

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0cm;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height:<br><br><br>
normal"><span style="font-size: 10.5pt; font-family: Helvetica, sans-serif; background-image: initial; background-position: initial; background-size: initial; background-repeat: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial;">Thanks for that insight Duncan.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10.5pt;">Coincidentally I looked at a Cass masters in&nbsp;2013 but in ‘Innovation, Creativity and Leadership.’ My career objectives were slightly&nbsp;different then. I didn’t apply as it was too difficult to fit around my work.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0cm;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height:<br><br><br>
normal"><span style="font-size: 10.5pt; font-family: Helvetica, sans-serif; background-image: initial; background-position: initial; background-size: initial; background-repeat: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial;"><br>As I said in my previous email, I work as an interim manager so I get paid by&nbsp;the day by my clients. The Cass course you suggested looks like it is campus attendance&nbsp;based which might need perhaps 30-40 days attendance over 2 years. That would&nbsp;cost me around £30-40k lost earnings which isn’t feasible at the moment. Hence&nbsp;why I posted that I need a largely online course so I can study mainly in the evenings&nbsp;plus weekends. My work is also geographically dispersed so trying to study in&nbsp;the same place could be tricky. <o:p></o:p></span></p><br><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0cm;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height:<br><br><br>
normal"><span style="font-family: Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10.5pt;">The Said course I mentioned is an 8 week online&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10.5pt;">course specifically in leadership, i.e. no finance, strategy etc. I accept it&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10.5pt;">doesn’t compare to an MBA course at all but personally that course might suit my&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10.5pt;">specific needs. I believe that leadership is best learnt by practice on the job&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10.5pt;">and such a course would give me a framework and tools to apply that in real&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10.5pt;">life experience.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0cm;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height:<br><br><br>
normal"><br></p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0cm;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height:<br><br><br>
normal"><span style="font-size: 10.5pt; font-family: Helvetica, sans-serif; background-image: initial; background-position: initial; background-size: initial; background-repeat: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial;">I had looked at the CIM for digital marketing&nbsp;courses but hadn’t thought of something like ICAEW.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 10.5pt; font-family: Helvetica, sans-serif;">I’m now thinking of using a specialist CIO career&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 10.5pt; font-family: Helvetica, sans-serif;">development/ coaching company that a friend just recommended. That might give me&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 10.5pt; font-family: Helvetica, sans-serif;">some more career specific insight into what type of course would be most appropriate&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 10.5pt; font-family: Helvetica, sans-serif;">as it seems there are several ways to approach this.</span></p><br><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0cm;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height:<br><br><br>
normal"><span style="font-family: Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10.5pt;">Thanks again.</span><br></p>
quote
Duncan

Also see: https://find-mba.com/board/distance-learning/value-alternatives-to-unaccredited-mbas-58288

Also see:&nbsp;https://find-mba.com/board/distance-learning/value-alternatives-to-unaccredited-mbas-58288
quote
aslamo



I'm going a bit full circle here but I did look at the Maryland Core MBA a few weeks ago. I thought (perhaps mistakenly?) that I needed something more 'executive' orientated given my lengthy work experience.

However, purely from a curriculum perspective, it addresses all my main knowledge gaps, namely corporate finance and strategy plus marketing and as a bonus includes leadership and digital business. Purely from a price, online mode of study and time commitment, it looks quite suitable.

As I understand it, this core might equate to about 25% of a full MBA. If that's true, would it likely be more comprehensive and rigorous than any executive non-MBA course at diploma/certificate level? I see plenty of Exec Education courses at business schools like Cambridge or Oxford of 10-15 days attendance.

[quote]Also see:&nbsp;https://find-mba.com/board/distance-learning/value-alternatives-to-unaccredited-mbas-58288 [/quote]<br><br>I'm going a bit full circle here but I did look at the Maryland Core MBA a few weeks ago. I thought (perhaps mistakenly?) that I needed something more 'executive' orientated given my lengthy work experience.<br><br>However, purely from a curriculum perspective, it addresses all my main knowledge gaps, namely corporate finance and strategy plus marketing and as a bonus includes leadership and digital business. Purely from a price, online mode of study and time commitment, it looks quite suitable.<br><br>As I understand it, this core might equate to about 25% of a full MBA. If that's true, would it likely be more comprehensive and rigorous than any executive non-MBA course at diploma/certificate level? I see plenty of Exec Education courses at business schools like Cambridge or Oxford of 10-15 days attendance.
quote
Duncan

It's a bit more extensive than you might imagine. This is 14 credits of a US MBA. Remember that a US masters is typically twice as long as the UK. 14 US credits would equate to 28 ECTS or 56 UK credits. A typical UK MBA would be 60 credits in the core; 60 credits of electives and 60 credits in a project report or thesis. So, what you have from Smith is something very comparable to the entire core curriculum a UK MBA.

It's a bit more extensive than you might imagine. This is 14 credits of a US MBA. Remember that a US masters is typically twice as long as the UK. 14 US credits would equate to 28 ECTS or 56 UK credits. A typical UK MBA would be 60 credits in the core; 60 credits of electives and 60 credits in a project report or thesis. So, what you have from Smith is something very comparable to the entire core curriculum a UK MBA.
quote
Duncan

would it likely be more comprehensive and rigorous than any executive non-MBA course at diploma/certificate level?


I think one difference is between programmes with academic credit and serious assessment, versus things with attendance certificates like the LSE online certificates. For example, the OUBS postgraduate diploma in business is a rock solid management qualification with serious academic rigour. On the other hand, many executive 'certificates' simply certify my ability to sit still.

[Edited by Duncan on Jun 20, 2020]

[quote]would it likely be more comprehensive and rigorous than any executive non-MBA course at diploma/certificate level? [/quote]<br><br>I think one difference is between programmes with academic credit and serious assessment, versus things with attendance certificates like the LSE online certificates. For example, the OUBS postgraduate diploma in business is a rock solid management qualification with serious academic rigour. On the other hand, many executive 'certificates' simply certify my ability to sit still.<br>
quote
aslamo

It's a bit more extensive than you might imagine. This is 14 credits of a US MBA. Remember that a US masters is typically twice as long as the UK. 14 US credits would equate to 28 ECTS or 56 UK credits. A typical UK MBA would be 60 credits in the core; 60 credits of electives and 60 credits in a project report or thesis. So, what you have from Smith is something very comparable to the entire core curriculum a UK MBA.


Duncan, I reflected on your comment about the Maryland EdX core course being equivalent to almost a UK MBA core and suddenly the way forward for me became much clearer. I'm now looking at doing the Maryland course as my ‘core’ and using the five modules from the Boston Questrom EdX Micromasters in Digital Leadership as my electives (which equate to 8 credits.) The Boston modules also give me an additional option of doing additional courses at Questrom in future to qualify for a Digital Business qualification – one that has been highly recommend to me.

Total cost is a mere £2,700. Plus much greater flexibility to do the modules as and when I want and filling in all the gaps in knowledge for my particular career path. As I don’t really need the salary boost or networking benefits, it seems a good fit for my needs.

[Edited by aslamo on Jun 27, 2020]

[quote]It's a bit more extensive than you might imagine. This is 14 credits of a US MBA. Remember that a US masters is typically twice as long as the UK. 14 US credits would equate to 28 ECTS or 56 UK credits. A typical UK MBA would be 60 credits in the core; 60 credits of electives and 60 credits in a project report or thesis. So, what you have from Smith is something very comparable to the entire core curriculum a UK MBA. [/quote]<br><br><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10.5pt; line-height: 107%; font-family: Helvetica, sans-serif; background-image: initial; background-position: initial; background-size: initial; background-repeat: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial;">Duncan, I reflected on your&nbsp;comment about the Maryland EdX core course being equivalent to almost a UK MBA&nbsp;core and suddenly the way forward for me became much clearer.&nbsp;</span><span style="background-image: initial; background-position: initial; background-size: initial; background-repeat: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; font-size: 10.5pt; line-height: 107%; font-family: Helvetica, sans-serif;">I'm now looking at doing&nbsp;the Maryland course as my&nbsp;</span>‘core’ and using the five modules from the&nbsp;Boston Questrom EdX Micromasters in Digital Leadership as my electives (which equate to 8 credits.) The Boston modules also give me an additional option of&nbsp;doing additional courses at Questrom in future to qualify for&nbsp;a Digital Business qualification – one that has been highly recommend to me.</p><p class="MsoNormal"><o:p></o:p></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10.5pt; line-height: 107%; font-family: Helvetica, sans-serif; background-image: initial; background-position: initial; background-size: initial; background-repeat: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial;">Total cost is a mere&nbsp;£2,700. Plus much greater flexibility to do the modules as and when I want and&nbsp;filling in all the gaps in knowledge for my particular career path. As I don’t&nbsp;really need the salary boost or networking benefits, it seems a good fit for my&nbsp;needs.</span><o:p></o:p></p>
quote
Duncan

Those Micromasters are great value  

Those Micromasters are great value&nbsp;&nbsp;
quote

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