MBA with tuition fee : $25,000 to $30,000


ezra

In Europe at least, I don't see that it makes so much difference concerning earnings.

From this year's FT MBA rankings:

INSEAD's graduates increased their earnings 97% post-MBA.
IE Business School's grads increased theirs by 139%
At IESE, it's 148%

And I could go on. In each of these cases, most graduates effectively doubled their salaries. If that's not quantifiable proof of a good investment, then I don't know what is.

<blockquote>In Europe at least, I don't see that it makes so much difference concerning earnings. </blockquote>
From this year's FT MBA rankings:

INSEAD's graduates increased their earnings 97% post-MBA.
IE Business School's grads increased theirs by 139%
At IESE, it's 148%

And I could go on. In each of these cases, most graduates effectively doubled their salaries. If that's not quantifiable proof of a good investment, then I don't know what is.
quote
ioannis

Very good input and good information for MBA seekers. FT MBA ranking is a good source for a general view and it is based on statistics from salaries from the graduates (if someone can really get this information). Of course statistics are based on certain factors. If someone consults the list then it can be seen that the 95th Business school of Ipade has much better percentage in salary increase than INSEAD which is placed 6th (176% vs 97%). Therefore, someone could assume that is not just about the school but it depends more on the graduate to use it properly and also the place/country where he/she is going to work. For example, if I get an MBA from Harvard and seek a job in Greece or in Romania, Poland, Slovakia etc there is no way that my salary will be doubled or tripled just because of that. In that case, especially if you are not wealthy enough, the investment is quite bad.

Very good input and good information for MBA seekers. FT MBA ranking is a good source for a general view and it is based on statistics from salaries from the graduates (if someone can really get this information). Of course statistics are based on certain factors. If someone consults the list then it can be seen that the 95th Business school of Ipade has much better percentage in salary increase than INSEAD which is placed 6th (176% vs 97%). Therefore, someone could assume that is not just about the school but it depends more on the graduate to use it properly and also the place/country where he/she is going to work. For example, if I get an MBA from Harvard and seek a job in Greece or in Romania, Poland, Slovakia etc there is no way that my salary will be doubled or tripled just because of that. In that case, especially if you are not wealthy enough, the investment is quite bad.
quote
donho199

Well I think you can talk about the argument of formal education vs on-the-job-training. If you count the top 100 billionaires i dont know maybe only 10 of them have a degree the others dropped out from college or never have formal education. If you count CEO of of FTSE 100 or 500 etc. many less than half of them have an MBA.

Like any big investment, you just have to do the research. And dont focus on the fees because the total cost of an MBA is far greater than fees. You dont want to spend probably 2 years (or even more if you count the time to prepare for the applications and take the GMAT and TOELF) of your life doing something that is not very helpful.

And furthermore, do have a clear idea what an MBA can help you and take the long shot, dont just think you will work for an investment bank and earn half-a-million-dollar after two or three years. Think what an MBA will do for you in 20 or 30 years down the line.

If you have not thought about that then you have not thought about it well enough and consequently wont be able to make the best of out it

Well I think you can talk about the argument of formal education vs on-the-job-training. If you count the top 100 billionaires i dont know maybe only 10 of them have a degree the others dropped out from college or never have formal education. If you count CEO of of FTSE 100 or 500 etc. many less than half of them have an MBA.

Like any big investment, you just have to do the research. And dont focus on the fees because the total cost of an MBA is far greater than fees. You dont want to spend probably 2 years (or even more if you count the time to prepare for the applications and take the GMAT and TOELF) of your life doing something that is not very helpful.

And furthermore, do have a clear idea what an MBA can help you and take the long shot, dont just think you will work for an investment bank and earn half-a-million-dollar after two or three years. Think what an MBA will do for you in 20 or 30 years down the line.

If you have not thought about that then you have not thought about it well enough and consequently wont be able to make the best of out it
quote
Duncan

Self-evidently, the MBA graduate is part of the factor. But that choice isn't just about how they use their MBA, but also how they select the school, and their electives, and the firms on which they apply to work for. However, it would be mistaken to assume that Ipade students are more successful than Insead students, since Insead students earn 60% more (when weighted for PPP).

What the rankings also show is the general trade off between final salary and percentage increase. Schools find it easy to have a high average percentage increase in salary if the students are not earning that much on the way in. The top ten schools produce alumni with an average salary around 159K; the ten at the last 10 of the top 100 produce an average of 92K. The schools producing the highest increases in salary are focused on the high growth regions of Asia and Latin America, but the average salary at those schools is around 107K: below the average for the whole top 100 (116K).

Self-evidently, the MBA graduate is part of the factor. But that choice isn't just about how they use their MBA, but also how they select the school, and their electives, and the firms on which they apply to work for. However, it would be mistaken to assume that Ipade students are more successful than Insead students, since Insead students earn 60% more (when weighted for PPP).

What the rankings also show is the general trade off between final salary and percentage increase. Schools find it easy to have a high average percentage increase in salary if the students are not earning that much on the way in. The top ten schools produce alumni with an average salary around 159K; the ten at the last 10 of the top 100 produce an average of 92K. The schools producing the highest increases in salary are focused on the high growth regions of Asia and Latin America, but the average salary at those schools is around 107K: below the average for the whole top 100 (116K).
quote
ezra

For example, if I get an MBA from Harvard and seek a job in Greece or in Romania, Poland, Slovakia etc there is no way that my salary will be doubled or tripled just because of that.


Indeed, this is true. I was just responding to your statement that MBA programs in Europe aren't necessarily a good investment:
In Europe at least, I don't see that it makes so much difference concerning earnings.

When in fact, there is quantifiable evidence to the contrary.

<blockquote>For example, if I get an MBA from Harvard and seek a job in Greece or in Romania, Poland, Slovakia etc there is no way that my salary will be doubled or tripled just because of that.</blockquote>

Indeed, this is true. I was just responding to your statement that MBA programs in Europe aren't necessarily a good investment:
<blockquote>In Europe at least, I don't see that it makes so much difference concerning earnings.</blockquote>
When in fact, there is quantifiable evidence to the contrary.
quote
Duncan

I think that if someone goes from Greece, Poland, Romania or Slovakia to Harvard and then returns then it's quite possible they will double their salary. Recent IESE alumni in Eastern Europe earn more than alumni in Spain.

I think that if someone goes from Greece, Poland, Romania or Slovakia to Harvard and then returns then it's quite possible they will double their salary. Recent IESE alumni in Eastern Europe earn more than alumni in Spain.
quote
donho199

Greek anti-fascist protesters 'tortured by police' after Golden Dawn clash

Fifteen people arrested in Athens says they were subjected to what their lawyer describes as an Abu Ghraib-style humiliation

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/oct/09/greek-antifascist-protesters-torture-police?INTCMP=SRCH

Probably not so many want to do an MBA here

Greek anti-fascist protesters 'tortured by police' after Golden Dawn clash

Fifteen people arrested in Athens says they were subjected to what their lawyer describes as an Abu Ghraib-style humiliation

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/oct/09/greek-antifascist-protesters-torture-police?INTCMP=SRCH

Probably not so many want to do an MBA here
quote
maubia

I think that if someone goes from Greece, Poland, Romania or Slovakia to Harvard and then returns then it's quite possible they will double their salary. Recent IESE alumni in Eastern Europe earn more than alumni in Spain.


This summer I was in Romania and talked a bit with a girl (29y) who graduated from Harvard, took something from Yale and an mba from Imperial (all with scholarships, since she won the math olympic games years ago). Now she is employed part-time in London for a lawyer... In Romania nobody even considers to hire someone (a former Archeromittal manager , friend of mine, gets 2000e per month) with such profile, she tried Austria but they suggested to cut down her education since it's too much, in uk no way...
Of course such stories will always exist but betting on E.Europe is very risky.. you can get money only if you relocate there sent by a western companies (I also remember when I used to go to Poland... the CFO was an italian who emigrated there and was hired locally, his wage was 400e/month, the other italians sent there by the HQ was getting 3-4000e/month). Of course living costs are lower..but only if you live like a local :-)

<blockquote>I think that if someone goes from Greece, Poland, Romania or Slovakia to Harvard and then returns then it's quite possible they will double their salary. Recent IESE alumni in Eastern Europe earn more than alumni in Spain.</blockquote>

This summer I was in Romania and talked a bit with a girl (29y) who graduated from Harvard, took something from Yale and an mba from Imperial (all with scholarships, since she won the math olympic games years ago). Now she is employed part-time in London for a lawyer... In Romania nobody even considers to hire someone (a former Archeromittal manager , friend of mine, gets 2000e per month) with such profile, she tried Austria but they suggested to cut down her education since it's too much, in uk no way...
Of course such stories will always exist but betting on E.Europe is very risky.. you can get money only if you relocate there sent by a western companies (I also remember when I used to go to Poland... the CFO was an italian who emigrated there and was hired locally, his wage was 400e/month, the other italians sent there by the HQ was getting 3-4000e/month). Of course living costs are lower..but only if you live like a local :-)
quote
ioannis

Greek anti-fascist protesters 'tortured by police' after Golden Dawn clash

Fifteen people arrested in Athens says they were subjected to what their lawyer describes as an Abu Ghraib-style humiliation

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/oct/09/greek-antifascist-protesters-torture-police?INTCMP=SRCH

Probably not so many want to do an MBA here


This is irrelevant to the MBA and life in Athens. Personally, I do not know anyone who lives in Athens that this has happened to him/her ever. This happens only to people who want to get involved in the episodes with the police in the city center during protests and you cannot be really sure what exactly happened. During a fight and arrests, there are people who might behave very bad. But if you are looking for a fight then you cannot complain about it. People who have lived in Athens for a long time know much better if it is dangerous or not. Likewise, someone can say that studying in USA is not a good idea since it is a country that the weapon possession is legal and gangs or 10 year old children are killing people in schools and on the streets. So, let's not generalize. Many things happen but they don't make the rule.

<blockquote>Greek anti-fascist protesters 'tortured by police' after Golden Dawn clash

Fifteen people arrested in Athens says they were subjected to what their lawyer describes as an Abu Ghraib-style humiliation

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/oct/09/greek-antifascist-protesters-torture-police?INTCMP=SRCH

Probably not so many want to do an MBA here</blockquote>

This is irrelevant to the MBA and life in Athens. Personally, I do not know anyone who lives in Athens that this has happened to him/her ever. This happens only to people who want to get involved in the episodes with the police in the city center during protests and you cannot be really sure what exactly happened. During a fight and arrests, there are people who might behave very bad. But if you are looking for a fight then you cannot complain about it. People who have lived in Athens for a long time know much better if it is dangerous or not. Likewise, someone can say that studying in USA is not a good idea since it is a country that the weapon possession is legal and gangs or 10 year old children are killing people in schools and on the streets. So, let's not generalize. Many things happen but they don't make the rule.
quote
ralph

So, let's not generalize. Many things happen but they don't make the rule.

I tend to agree with this - I'm not sure that international students are more at risk in Greece than in other European countries (let's keep in mind that there are similar hate groups in the UK, France, etc.) If you're doing an MBA in a foreign country, the keys are to educate yourself on what's happening, avoid high-risk neighborhoods, and generally keep a low profile. Having a command of the language is also a benefit, so that you can understand what's going on.

<blockquote>So, let's not generalize. Many things happen but they don't make the rule.</blockquote>
I tend to agree with this - I'm not sure that international students are more at risk in Greece than in other European countries (let's keep in mind that there are similar hate groups in the UK, France, etc.) If you're doing an MBA in a foreign country, the keys are to educate yourself on what's happening, avoid high-risk neighborhoods, and generally keep a low profile. Having a command of the language is also a benefit, so that you can understand what's going on.
quote
donho199

During A Violent Incident At A Greek Theater, An Elected Official Went On One Of The Most Vile Rants Imaginable

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/golden-dawn-incident-at-theater-in-athens-2012-10#ixzz292a7wE5D

Have a good read

During A Violent Incident At A Greek Theater, An Elected Official Went On One Of The Most Vile Rants Imaginable

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/golden-dawn-incident-at-theater-in-athens-2012-10#ixzz292a7wE5D

Have a good read
quote
ioannis

What you posted here is a translation from comments on twitter from someone who no one knows his name and his occupation. I read his twitter myself. Maybe you should start reading articles that have more accurate sources than twitter. Also, Greek people appreciate your effort to help Greece to re-built its broken image to the world. The "have a good read" shows your attitude too.
It is really amazing how people are publishing articles (and taking credits for that) based on someone's comments on twitter. Because of this, a Greek athlete was expelled from the London Olympics. Since when the comments on twitter or facebook are legal statements? I don't have time for chatting about this. People who are well traveled and educated enough can judge on their own.

What you posted here is a translation from comments on twitter from someone who no one knows his name and his occupation. I read his twitter myself. Maybe you should start reading articles that have more accurate sources than twitter. Also, Greek people appreciate your effort to help Greece to re-built its broken image to the world. The "have a good read" shows your attitude too.
It is really amazing how people are publishing articles (and taking credits for that) based on someone's comments on twitter. Because of this, a Greek athlete was expelled from the London Olympics. Since when the comments on twitter or facebook are legal statements? I don't have time for chatting about this. People who are well traveled and educated enough can judge on their own.
quote
ioannis

I have to admit though that the attacks to immigrants or look-a-like immigrants have been increased the last months. However, I consider them individual cases that are reported more often these days in the fear of the possibility that the extremist people from Golden Dawn will rise in the next elections. It is really a pity what is happening but the non-logical pressure from EU has a piece of responsibility for this outcome. There are hundreds or thousands "non white" immigrants (most of them illegal) in the city center of Athens and incidents of attacks were always happening from time to time like in every large city. From both sides not just by Greeks. But I want to point out that what you read is not an average Greek behavior. These incidents are condemnable by the vast majority in Greece. I know we are off topic but I just to calm people down that they should not be afraid to visit or live in Athens.

I have to admit though that the attacks to immigrants or look-a-like immigrants have been increased the last months. However, I consider them individual cases that are reported more often these days in the fear of the possibility that the extremist people from Golden Dawn will rise in the next elections. It is really a pity what is happening but the non-logical pressure from EU has a piece of responsibility for this outcome. There are hundreds or thousands "non white" immigrants (most of them illegal) in the city center of Athens and incidents of attacks were always happening from time to time like in every large city. From both sides not just by Greeks. But I want to point out that what you read is not an average Greek behavior. These incidents are condemnable by the vast majority in Greece. I know we are off topic but I just to calm people down that they should not be afraid to visit or live in Athens.
quote
kdelis

Hi

I would like to know institutes that provide full time MBA (U.S. and non U.S. )with overall tuition fee in range of $25,000 to $30,000



Actually for a range of $25.000-$30.000 you can find really good programs in Holland for example, RSM or Nyenrode. These are very prestigious programs and Dutch corporations easily hire MBA students from these schools. My $0.2.

<blockquote>Hi

I would like to know institutes that provide full time MBA (U.S. and non U.S. )with overall tuition fee in range of $25,000 to $30,000


</blockquote>
Actually for a range of $25.000-$30.000 you can find really good programs in Holland for example, RSM or Nyenrode. These are very prestigious programs and Dutch corporations easily hire MBA students from these schools. My $0.2.
quote
Coddy

Another option is IAE Aix in France.

As part of public university (this is the only french public university school to receive dual accreditation EQUIS and AMBA), they can offer a pretty good full time mba (change & innovation) for 22000?.

Another option is IAE Aix in France.

As part of public university (this is the only french public university school to receive dual accreditation EQUIS and AMBA), they can offer a pretty good full time mba (change & innovation) for 22000?.
quote
mba hipste...

Have you done the IAE Aix program? Care to comment on its return on investment.

While it is inexpensive, many MBA candidates are looking not just at program cost, but for good placements and solid career growth after the program. It is a decision that is ultimately based on economics, after all. Since I can't seem to find any post-MBA salary statistics from IAE, it's hard to determine whether it would be a good investment or not.

Have you done the IAE Aix program? Care to comment on its return on investment.

While it is inexpensive, many MBA candidates are looking not just at program cost, but for good placements and solid career growth after the program. It is a decision that is ultimately based on economics, after all. Since I can't seem to find any post-MBA salary statistics from IAE, it's hard to determine whether it would be a good investment or not.
quote

Hey, just to get back to the original question... Does anybody know of any US MBA programs with a budget of around $30,000? Or are programs in this budget just a myth?

Hey, just to get back to the original question... Does anybody know of any US MBA programs with a budget of around $30,000? Or are programs in this budget just a myth?
quote
Duncan

http://www.topmanagementdegrees.com/most-affordable-mbas/

http://www.topmanagementdegrees.com/most-affordable-mbas/
quote

One option:
The MBA with Internship program at Sacred Heart University Luxembourg takes 16 months, includes a 6-9 month paid internship and costs euro 29,000 (teaching material included). You will receive an American MBA recognized by the Luxembourg Ministry of Higher Education.

[Edited by SHULuxembourg on Mar 05, 2015]

One option:
The MBA with Internship program at Sacred Heart University Luxembourg takes 16 months, includes a 6-9 month paid internship and costs euro 29,000 (teaching material included). You will receive an American MBA recognized by the Luxembourg Ministry of Higher Education.
quote
Duncan

What are salaries like for the internships? And what are placement rates like after the MBA for non-EU students?

What are salaries like for the internships? And what are placement rates like after the MBA for non-EU students?
quote

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