Job prospects in the U.S. w/ MBA from Korea University??


Recent college graduate from a respectable university in California. I have an opportunity to pursue my MBA at Korea University (best in S. Korea) but I eventually want to make it back to the U.S. so here's my question: How will my job prospects improve by receiving my MBA from KUBS? Any general thoughts on American citizens going to Asia to get their MBA?? Any help is appreciated!!!

Recent college graduate from a respectable university in California. I have an opportunity to pursue my MBA at Korea University (best in S. Korea) but I eventually want to make it back to the U.S. so here's my question: How will my job prospects improve by receiving my MBA from KUBS? Any general thoughts on American citizens going to Asia to get their MBA?? Any help is appreciated!!!
quote
Lost4Now

As for your first question: Your job prospects may improve in the sense that you may become the "Asia Specialist." In a globalizing world where power is shifting towards the East it's very clear how this can be advantageous.

As for your second question on general thoughts:
Doing an MBA in Asia is generally pretty risky businesss. There are very few programs in Asia that are not risky in my opinion. INSEAD Singapore is the only program I can think of off the top of my head. From what I read, it seems like Asian people (say you are Korean-American for example) doing an MBA in their homeland increases the risk substantially. You would just be seen as someone who couldn't make it abroad, and had to come back for an education at home. If you are white, hispanic etc... then automatically you would be classified as someone who is opportunistic and adventurous, trying to understand and learn more about the world's fastest growing markets.

I suggest you just read old posts on this board, there's a lot more info to be gained.


As for your first question: Your job prospects may improve in the sense that you may become the "Asia Specialist." In a globalizing world where power is shifting towards the East it's very clear how this can be advantageous.

As for your second question on general thoughts:
Doing an MBA in Asia is generally pretty risky businesss. There are very few programs in Asia that are not risky in my opinion. INSEAD Singapore is the only program I can think of off the top of my head. From what I read, it seems like Asian people (say you are Korean-American for example) doing an MBA in their homeland increases the risk substantially. You would just be seen as someone who couldn't make it abroad, and had to come back for an education at home. If you are white, hispanic etc... then automatically you would be classified as someone who is opportunistic and adventurous, trying to understand and learn more about the world's fastest growing markets.

I suggest you just read old posts on this board, there's a lot more info to be gained.
quote
Rhino

There are lots of american-born asians who are attending MBA programs in Asia like singapore, hong Kong and china.
I believe having an Asian degree for american/european will give an edge only in the long term, means that in the short-term you will struggle a bit because asian degree is considered as 2nd-tier at best.
Even when FT ranked HK-UST MBA in the top ten, it is still not considered as a better degree compared to degree from N.america or western europe.
This is an unfortunate thing to have.But this is the Asian view,

For your case, with a korean MBA degree, you will only go far in east asia.
In korean peninsula, your degree considered top-notch, but the prestige won't travel far across the atlantic ocean.
But why do you want to work in U.S. in the first place?
Don't you want to work in Asia? It can gives you international working exposure and attractive long-lasting life experience.
The U.S. and europe are full of unemployed people. And their economies will only take off in the next decade (after they finish paying off their heavy debts).

There are lots of american-born asians who are attending MBA programs in Asia like singapore, hong Kong and china.
I believe having an Asian degree for american/european will give an edge only in the long term, means that in the short-term you will struggle a bit because asian degree is considered as 2nd-tier at best.
Even when FT ranked HK-UST MBA in the top ten, it is still not considered as a better degree compared to degree from N.america or western europe.
This is an unfortunate thing to have.But this is the Asian view,

For your case, with a korean MBA degree, you will only go far in east asia.
In korean peninsula, your degree considered top-notch, but the prestige won't travel far across the atlantic ocean.
But why do you want to work in U.S. in the first place?
Don't you want to work in Asia? It can gives you international working exposure and attractive long-lasting life experience.
The U.S. and europe are full of unemployed people. And their economies will only take off in the next decade (after they finish paying off their heavy debts).


quote

Thank you guys so much for your time and insight, they've been extremely helpful.

Rhino- You're absolutely right. Living in Asia might be a good life decision. I'm only 23, if I were going to live in a foreign country (after KUBS, I'd probably look to finding Finance-related work in China/HK/Singapore) this would be the time to do it.

Plus, with East-Asia and all of its emerging economies, getting a couple years of work experience at a high-profile firm would definitely help me with coming back to the States and netting a respectable job, wouldn't you think? That way, I would gain valuable job experience in Finance that I might not have been able to get in the U.S., a couple years of living abroad, learn a new language to help with my future career (like Lost4Now said, I could pursue something in the "Asia Specialist" sector??) I'm still young and lack the mentoring that others who are already in the finance world benefit from. Any thoughts on that possible career path? Thanks again for you times!

Thank you guys so much for your time and insight, they've been extremely helpful.

Rhino- You're absolutely right. Living in Asia might be a good life decision. I'm only 23, if I were going to live in a foreign country (after KUBS, I'd probably look to finding Finance-related work in China/HK/Singapore) this would be the time to do it.

Plus, with East-Asia and all of its emerging economies, getting a couple years of work experience at a high-profile firm would definitely help me with coming back to the States and netting a respectable job, wouldn't you think? That way, I would gain valuable job experience in Finance that I might not have been able to get in the U.S., a couple years of living abroad, learn a new language to help with my future career (like Lost4Now said, I could pursue something in the "Asia Specialist" sector??) I'm still young and lack the mentoring that others who are already in the finance world benefit from. Any thoughts on that possible career path? Thanks again for you times!

quote
Rhino

Possible career path depends on the country.
Since I live in singapore, I could give you some insights on finance jobs here.

Singapore will be the global Private banking and investment banking back office.
I know that UBS and merril lynch has set up something big in singapore.
All of the big banks and elite private banks from switzerland are setting up shops here.
Same also true for I-Banking operation, personally I know that BarCap are migrating all operation shops in London and New York to singapore.
And since singapore is a tax-haven country, lots of hedge funds operate here.

Singapore has the lowest tax rate (for its citizens and permanent resident) in the world.
I paid only ~4% income tax and my salary is already above average.
Corporate tax is ~18% (before govt tax rebates). Food are great and dirt cheap.
The only downside is expensive property price but not as crazy expensive like H.K.

Possible career path depends on the country.
Since I live in singapore, I could give you some insights on finance jobs here.

Singapore will be the global Private banking and investment banking back office.
I know that UBS and merril lynch has set up something big in singapore.
All of the big banks and elite private banks from switzerland are setting up shops here.
Same also true for I-Banking operation, personally I know that BarCap are migrating all operation shops in London and New York to singapore.
And since singapore is a tax-haven country, lots of hedge funds operate here.

Singapore has the lowest tax rate (for its citizens and permanent resident) in the world.
I paid only ~4% income tax and my salary is already above average.
Corporate tax is ~18% (before govt tax rebates). Food are great and dirt cheap.
The only downside is expensive property price but not as crazy expensive like H.K.
quote

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