Netherlands Work Visa and job hunt guidance


Hi All,

This will be my 2nd topic posting here. This time I would like to have some suggestions on the general flow of process from job hunting to finally settling down, particularly in Netherlands. This will be for NON EU international students.

So after getting done with studies in Dec 2017 , I should probably be working as an intern / full time (hard it seems ). By the time my internship ends I should have a job offer in hand. All these should be within the 1 yr job search visa that I will get after my graduation in March 2018.

Now questions

1. How easy is to get work visa sponsor ? Are the employers ready to take the pain to go for the extra paperwork? I had pretty hard time in US to get one.

2. After getting a job do I need a separate work permit and residency permit?

3. Can I work in Germany if I graduate in Netherlands ?

4. Can I get the Blue Card from Day 1 in my full time job?


Thanks in advance for your effort to answer this question.
Hi All,

This will be my 2nd topic posting here. This time I would like to have some suggestions on the general flow of process from job hunting to finally settling down, particularly in Netherlands. This will be for NON EU international students.

So after getting done with studies in Dec 2017 , I should probably be working as an intern / full time (hard it seems ). By the time my internship ends I should have a job offer in hand. All these should be within the 1 yr job search visa that I will get after my graduation in March 2018.

Now questions

1. How easy is to get work visa sponsor ? Are the employers ready to take the pain to go for the extra paperwork? I had pretty hard time in US to get one.

2. After getting a job do I need a separate work permit and residency permit?

3. Can I work in Germany if I graduate in Netherlands ?

4. Can I get the Blue Card from Day 1 in my full time job?


Thanks in advance for your effort to answer this question.
quote
Duncan
I think you can answer these with google. I don't understand question 3.
I think you can answer these with google. I don't understand question 3.
quote
I think you can answer these with google. I don't understand question 3.


For 3 its just that. If I graduate in a school from Netherlands, can I apply for positions in Germany also?
[quote]I think you can answer these with google. I don't understand question 3. [/quote]

For 3 its just that. If I graduate in a school from Netherlands, can I apply for positions in Germany also?
quote
Duncan
You can apply to jobs anywhere with or without any degree.
You can apply to jobs anywhere with or without any degree.
quote
venomdog
Hi,
I am not a student but I live & work in NL (10 years) I can answer few of your questions based upon my experience

1. How easy is to get work visa sponsor ? Are the employers ready to take the pain to go for the extra paperwork? I had pretty hard time in US to get one.

>> Not that easy, it depends on the employer indeed but a reputed college can get you job, having said that you also get 1 year to search for job (if I am not wrong) its called as zoekjaar visa (http://hoitalent.com/9), please check latest info on this word, because rules changes every year.

2. After getting a job do I need a separate work permit and residency permit?

>> NO, work permit is tied to residency, you will get mvv (also search this term) that gives you residence based upin duration of this mvv issued to you.

3. Can I work in Germany if I graduate in Netherlands ?

>> NO. you cannot.

4. Can I get the Blue Card from Day 1 in my full time job?

>> NO, you cannot as far as I know, Blue card is fairly new and not all EU countries accept it as you think they should.

Good Luck!!
Hi,
I am not a student but I live & work in NL (10 years) I can answer few of your questions based upon my experience

1. How easy is to get work visa sponsor ? Are the employers ready to take the pain to go for the extra paperwork? I had pretty hard time in US to get one.

>> Not that easy, it depends on the employer indeed but a reputed college can get you job, having said that you also get 1 year to search for job (if I am not wrong) its called as zoekjaar visa (http://hoitalent.com/9), please check latest info on this word, because rules changes every year.

2. After getting a job do I need a separate work permit and residency permit?

>> NO, work permit is tied to residency, you will get mvv (also search this term) that gives you residence based upin duration of this mvv issued to you.

3. Can I work in Germany if I graduate in Netherlands ?

>> NO. you cannot.

4. Can I get the Blue Card from Day 1 in my full time job?

>> NO, you cannot as far as I know, Blue card is fairly new and not all EU countries accept it as you think they should.

Good Luck!!
quote
Duncan
Your answer to 3 is mistaken.

PS Ayon's post below is very insightful.

[Edited by Duncan on Mar 01, 2016]

Your answer to 3 is mistaken.

PS Ayon's post below is very insightful.
quote
Ayon
Hello Kaushik,

I think you need to be a little flexible, and prepare for various situations. No one can foresee the future or guarantee that you "should" have an job offer in hand. And all the favorable conditions "should" meet you within the 1 yr job search.
Life doesn't work that way.

Ease of getting work sponsor? Since you have already been through a similar process once in US. I think it's time for you introspect and ask, What skill set do you have? Does employers want and value those skills ?
If you have the skill set (specialized skills) then employer will think about sponsoring you provided they cannot find those skills in the home workforce (and hence the term special skill)

One of my friend (Indian) is currently working in Stockholm, Sweden after graduating from Copenhagen Business School. He had prior experience as Consultant implementing Lean Six Sigma, and post his MBA doing pretty much the same thing. He told me that his job options are severely limited because of his language limitation.

Also, keep in mind that not all of Europe is 100% open about welcoming skilled immigrants. most countries in Europe are organized based on language, one cannot simply ignore the language and cultural importance if you want to live, work and immerse in Europe.

Can you work in Germany given you get your degree from Netherlands? Sure!! Why not? I have friends (Lithuanian) who are working in England after graduating school from Lithuania (they can work in EU/EEA), I also have seniors from my undergrad school working in Germany without any master's degree.

Again it comes down to skill set - they have special skills that are not easily found in the home workforce.

It would be in your interest to evaluate programs, countries and yourself on the basis on skills. You will have a better chance at a place your skill set can bridge the skill gap.

Good luck!

Hi All,

This will be my 2nd topic posting here. This time I would like to have some suggestions on the general flow of process from job hunting to finally settling down, particularly in Netherlands. This will be for NON EU international students.

So after getting done with studies in Dec 2017 , I should probably be working as an intern / full time (hard it seems ). By the time my internship ends I should have a job offer in hand. All these should be within the 1 yr job search visa that I will get after my graduation in March 2018.

Now questions

1. How easy is to get work visa sponsor ? Are the employers ready to take the pain to go for the extra paperwork? I had pretty hard time in US to get one.

2. After getting a job do I need a separate work permit and residency permit?

3. Can I work in Germany if I graduate in Netherlands ?

4. Can I get the Blue Card from Day 1 in my full time job?


Thanks in advance for your effort to answer this question.
Hello Kaushik,

I think you need to be a little flexible, and prepare for various situations. No one can foresee the future or guarantee that you "should" have an job offer in hand. And all the favorable conditions "should" meet you within the 1 yr job search.
Life doesn't work that way.

Ease of getting work sponsor? Since you have already been through a similar process once in US. I think it's time for you introspect and ask, What skill set do you have? Does employers want and value those skills ?
If you have the skill set (specialized skills) then employer will think about sponsoring you provided they cannot find those skills in the home workforce (and hence the term special skill)

One of my friend (Indian) is currently working in Stockholm, Sweden after graduating from Copenhagen Business School. He had prior experience as Consultant implementing Lean Six Sigma, and post his MBA doing pretty much the same thing. He told me that his job options are severely limited because of his language limitation.

Also, keep in mind that not all of Europe is 100% open about welcoming skilled immigrants. most countries in Europe are organized based on language, one cannot simply ignore the language and cultural importance if you want to live, work and immerse in Europe.

Can you work in Germany given you get your degree from Netherlands? Sure!! Why not? I have friends (Lithuanian) who are working in England after graduating school from Lithuania (they can work in EU/EEA), I also have seniors from my undergrad school working in Germany without any master's degree.

Again it comes down to skill set - they have special skills that are not easily found in the home workforce.

It would be in your interest to evaluate programs, countries and yourself on the basis on skills. You will have a better chance at a place your skill set can bridge the skill gap.

Good luck!

[quote]Hi All,

This will be my 2nd topic posting here. This time I would like to have some suggestions on the general flow of process from job hunting to finally settling down, particularly in Netherlands. This will be for NON EU international students.

So after getting done with studies in Dec 2017 , I should probably be working as an intern / full time (hard it seems ). By the time my internship ends I should have a job offer in hand. All these should be within the 1 yr job search visa that I will get after my graduation in March 2018.

Now questions

1. How easy is to get work visa sponsor ? Are the employers ready to take the pain to go for the extra paperwork? I had pretty hard time in US to get one.

2. After getting a job do I need a separate work permit and residency permit?

3. Can I work in Germany if I graduate in Netherlands ?

4. Can I get the Blue Card from Day 1 in my full time job?


Thanks in advance for your effort to answer this question.[/quote]
quote
Thank you all. I am learning German language for that purpose.

I will be targeting European Graduate Program for different chemical and FMCG companies. I fit in perfectly in operations management roles and have completed six sigma certification from KPMG. I have prior relevant work ex in operations and supply chain management.

Now one thing which I have learned the hard way is networking. And I am building on my networks from now and will leverage linkedin massively in coming months.

I know all things wont be in place magically so in future I might be looking for a professional mentor also.
Thank you all. I am learning German language for that purpose.

I will be targeting European Graduate Program for different chemical and FMCG companies. I fit in perfectly in operations management roles and have completed six sigma certification from KPMG. I have prior relevant work ex in operations and supply chain management.

Now one thing which I have learned the hard way is networking. And I am building on my networks from now and will leverage linkedin massively in coming months.

I know all things wont be in place magically so in future I might be looking for a professional mentor also.
quote
Duncan
Assuming that you are considering attending RSM, that seems like a valid strategy.
Assuming that you are considering attending RSM, that seems like a valid strategy.
quote
Assuming that you are considering attending RSM, that seems like a valid strategy.


Yes RSM
[quote]Assuming that you are considering attending RSM, that seems like a valid strategy. [/quote]

Yes RSM
quote

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