MSc Programs - Finance


Hello,

Thanks in advance to anyone who takes the time to read this - I will try to keep it brief. Also, I apologize if this is a bit dull, but I feel it is important to disclose some information about myself in order to help you answer my questions.

General

Age: 24
Nationality: Dual U.S. and Belgian citizenship
Languages: English and Spanish

Education

School: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (U.S.)
Degree: BS in Accounting - May 2007
GPA: 3.2/4.0
GMAT: N/A

Professional Experience:

Deloitte & Touche, LLP - Audit [New York, NY]
Financial Security Assurance - Financial Reporting [New York, NY]

I stumbled onto this site a few weeks ago on a whim and was surprised to find such helpful advice. Since then, I have done a considerable amount of research into business schools across Europe. I have narrowed my search to the following 10 programs, in no particular order:

1 EADA - International Master in Finance
2 EDHEC - MSc in Finance, MSc in Capital Markets
3 SDA Bocconi - Master in Corporate Finance
4 Rotterdam School of Management - Masters in Financial Management
5 ESADE - MSc in Finance
6 CERAM - MSc in International Finance, MSc in Financial Markets
7 City University: Cass - MSc in Investment Management, MSc in Banking & International Finance
8 Vlerick Leuven Gent - Masters in Finance
9 International University of Monaco - Masters in Finance
10 London School of Economics and Political Science - MSc in Finance

This may look like quite an exhaustive list, but it has taken me countless hours of research to narrow it down this far.

How would you rate these schools in terms of academic quality?

I am trying to determine my chances of admission to some of these programs. I am anticipating a GMAT score in the 680-720 range, based on practice test results.

My experience, both academically and professionally are restricted to accounting and audit work. As an undergraduate, I decided this would be a solid foundation for me to begin my career and knew that I would eventually obtain a post graduate degree in finance.

My experience with Deloitte was in the Audit: Financial Services group, where I had exposure to several global banking organizations [The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, Morgan Stanley, Natixis]. I held an internship during school and was subsequently offered a full time position.

Unfortunately, I was laid off in September, as were many of my colleagues. Luckily, I was able to quickly find a position at FSA - a financial guaranty insurance company - and have been there for about six months.

I am leaning towards Barcelona - in particular, EADA. I feel that ESADE may be too selective for my credentials.

Should I be aiming lower/higher?

Cost is a factor, but then again so is location, quality of education, recognition and accreditation, CFA partnership, etc...

Also - as I am seeking a career change, I assume it is best to select a Masters program, rather than an MBA. In my research, I have found that most MBA programs are for more qualified and experienced candidates. Perhaps I am wrong?

Please provide any feedback, its getting late and I may not be as clear as I would like to be - but any commentary would be appreciated and hopefully it will spark some new thoughts/ideas.

Thanks,
Eric

Hello,

Thanks in advance to anyone who takes the time to read this - I will try to keep it brief. Also, I apologize if this is a bit dull, but I feel it is important to disclose some information about myself in order to help you answer my questions.

General

Age: 24
Nationality: Dual U.S. and Belgian citizenship
Languages: English and Spanish

Education

School: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (U.S.)
Degree: BS in Accounting - May 2007
GPA: 3.2/4.0
GMAT: N/A

Professional Experience:

Deloitte & Touche, LLP - Audit [New York, NY]
Financial Security Assurance - Financial Reporting [New York, NY]

I stumbled onto this site a few weeks ago on a whim and was surprised to find such helpful advice. Since then, I have done a considerable amount of research into business schools across Europe. I have narrowed my search to the following 10 programs, in no particular order:

1 EADA - International Master in Finance
2 EDHEC - MSc in Finance, MSc in Capital Markets
3 SDA Bocconi - Master in Corporate Finance
4 Rotterdam School of Management - Masters in Financial Management
5 ESADE - MSc in Finance
6 CERAM - MSc in International Finance, MSc in Financial Markets
7 City University: Cass - MSc in Investment Management, MSc in Banking & International Finance
8 Vlerick Leuven Gent - Masters in Finance
9 International University of Monaco - Masters in Finance
10 London School of Economics and Political Science - MSc in Finance

This may look like quite an exhaustive list, but it has taken me countless hours of research to narrow it down this far.

How would you rate these schools in terms of academic quality?

I am trying to determine my chances of admission to some of these programs. I am anticipating a GMAT score in the 680-720 range, based on practice test results.

My experience, both academically and professionally are restricted to accounting and audit work. As an undergraduate, I decided this would be a solid foundation for me to begin my career and knew that I would eventually obtain a post graduate degree in finance.

My experience with Deloitte was in the Audit: Financial Services group, where I had exposure to several global banking organizations [The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, Morgan Stanley, Natixis]. I held an internship during school and was subsequently offered a full time position.

Unfortunately, I was laid off in September, as were many of my colleagues. Luckily, I was able to quickly find a position at FSA - a financial guaranty insurance company - and have been there for about six months.

I am leaning towards Barcelona - in particular, EADA. I feel that ESADE may be too selective for my credentials.

Should I be aiming lower/higher?

Cost is a factor, but then again so is location, quality of education, recognition and accreditation, CFA partnership, etc...

Also - as I am seeking a career change, I assume it is best to select a Masters program, rather than an MBA. In my research, I have found that most MBA programs are for more qualified and experienced candidates. Perhaps I am wrong?

Please provide any feedback, its getting late and I may not be as clear as I would like to be - but any commentary would be appreciated and hopefully it will spark some new thoughts/ideas.

Thanks,
Eric
quote
Alan

Hi Eric,

Don't think you should aim any lower, and I think you should try to apply for at least 1-2 MBA programs. You're quite young, but you've got experience and strong academic background, and if your GMAT really is in that range, you should get through to an interview stage, easy.

The MSc is less geared around careers, so you'll have to really get out there and network, particularly if you go to a school outside of the US. The MBA will push your comfort zone more, and you'll have to explain to your interviewers why you would want that.

LSE and Cass put you in close proximity to the sector's hub. LSE being the better school in terms of reputation, but I'm not sure they're as motivated to get students placed in jobs afterward. ESADE is a rising star in Europe. Rotterdam, Ghent, and EADA are also interesting choices.

Good luck. Alan

Hi Eric,

Don't think you should aim any lower, and I think you should try to apply for at least 1-2 MBA programs. You're quite young, but you've got experience and strong academic background, and if your GMAT really is in that range, you should get through to an interview stage, easy.

The MSc is less geared around careers, so you'll have to really get out there and network, particularly if you go to a school outside of the US. The MBA will push your comfort zone more, and you'll have to explain to your interviewers why you would want that.

LSE and Cass put you in close proximity to the sector's hub. LSE being the better school in terms of reputation, but I'm not sure they're as motivated to get students placed in jobs afterward. ESADE is a rising star in Europe. Rotterdam, Ghent, and EADA are also interesting choices.

Good luck. Alan
quote

Alan,

Thank you for the encouraging reply, I appreciate it.

You mention my "strong academic background" - is Rutgers a well reputed university in Europe? I feel that my GPA leaves much to be desired.

I think I will apply to a few MBA programs, although I am seeking a concentration in finance [capital markets/investment management based, as opposed to corporate finance]. Do you know of any schools that offer a more specialized MBA program?

Most of the programs I have taken a look at are more focused on management skills and general business education.

Regarding the GMAT, I am confident in obtaining a similar score on the actual exam - I am aiming for a 700.

Any others care to comment? I would particularly like to hear some input from former/current students of the aforementioned schools.

Thanks again,
Eric

Alan,

Thank you for the encouraging reply, I appreciate it.

You mention my "strong academic background" - is Rutgers a well reputed university in Europe? I feel that my GPA leaves much to be desired.

I think I will apply to a few MBA programs, although I am seeking a concentration in finance [capital markets/investment management based, as opposed to corporate finance]. Do you know of any schools that offer a more specialized MBA program?

Most of the programs I have taken a look at are more focused on management skills and general business education.

Regarding the GMAT, I am confident in obtaining a similar score on the actual exam - I am aiming for a 700.

Any others care to comment? I would particularly like to hear some input from former/current students of the aforementioned schools.

Thanks again,
Eric
quote
Alan

I'll just quickly comment on your academic background, and then bow out so that some true finance experts can step in...

Grad schools generally look at anything above an overall 3.0 GPA favorably. They know that an overall GPA also includes all the general, non-major courses they make you take as an undergrad in the States (to keep you paying tuition longer...;)) GPA is probably not a dealbreaker when it comes to b school admittance, but a 3.2 is solid enough not to raise eyebrows in the bad way.

A 700 GMAT will get you application in the "read" pile just about anywhere. Anything below a 670, and you have to start thinking about reigning in the ambition a bit.

Good luck to you.

I'll just quickly comment on your academic background, and then bow out so that some true finance experts can step in...

Grad schools generally look at anything above an overall 3.0 GPA favorably. They know that an overall GPA also includes all the general, non-major courses they make you take as an undergrad in the States (to keep you paying tuition longer...;)) GPA is probably not a dealbreaker when it comes to b school admittance, but a 3.2 is solid enough not to raise eyebrows in the bad way.

A 700 GMAT will get you application in the "read" pile just about anywhere. Anything below a 670, and you have to start thinking about reigning in the ambition a bit.

Good luck to you.
quote

Thank you sir.

Anyone else?

Is this thread's title not "sexy" enough, or am I just being impatient...probably both...

-Eric

Thank you sir.

Anyone else?

Is this thread's title not "sexy" enough, or am I just being impatient...probably both...

-Eric
quote

bump (sorry)

bump (sorry)
quote
tuscan21

what do you think about IE business school?
Is it better than ESADE or Bocconi?
I'm considering these 3 + Oxford for Msc in Finance.

what do you think about IE business school?
Is it better than ESADE or Bocconi?
I'm considering these 3 + Oxford for Msc in Finance.
quote
allianzg

Hi, I have received offers from ESADE and Cass (Msc in Finance), but I am having an hard time deciding which school to attend. What do you guys think would be the best choice? And why?

Thanks in advantage!

Hi, I have received offers from ESADE and Cass (Msc in Finance), but I am having an hard time deciding which school to attend. What do you guys think would be the best choice? And why?

Thanks in advantage!


quote
tuscan21

I'd choose ESADE if I were you

I'd choose ESADE if I were you
quote
allianzg

Thanks. Why? Is Cass considered to be a bit dodgy by the IBs in London? In my opinion there are three downsides by attending ESADE; the Msc in Finance programme is brand new, the programme is not being taught by native English speakers and the school isn't located in London.

I am still waiting on response from HEC and Bocconi, but since I applied so late I guess my chances are slim. I don't think I'll pick Bocconi over ESADE anyways, but if I'm accepted to HEC and I would definately go there.

What about yourself, have you made a decision yet?

Thanks. Why? Is Cass considered to be a bit dodgy by the IBs in London? In my opinion there are three downsides by attending ESADE; the Msc in Finance programme is brand new, the programme is not being taught by native English speakers and the school isn't located in London.

I am still waiting on response from HEC and Bocconi, but since I applied so late I guess my chances are slim. I don't think I'll pick Bocconi over ESADE anyways, but if I'm accepted to HEC and I would definately go there.

What about yourself, have you made a decision yet?
quote
allianzg

Bump, would like to hear more opinions about Msc in Finance at Cass vs ESADE.

Bump, would like to hear more opinions about Msc in Finance at Cass vs ESADE.
quote
mindstew

Hi alianzg,

I also applied to HEC Msc. Finance program but haven't heard from them yet. If I were you I would go with ESADE. A friend of mine goes to Cass and he is not terribly excited with the program and his career prospects. Besides, Barcelona is very nice. ;) Have you heard anything from HEC?

Hi alianzg,

I also applied to HEC Msc. Finance program but haven't heard from them yet. If I were you I would go with ESADE. A friend of mine goes to Cass and he is not terribly excited with the program and his career prospects. Besides, Barcelona is very nice. ;) Have you heard anything from HEC?
quote
MBAAdmCrac...

Hello,

Thanks in advance to anyone who takes the time to read this - I will try to keep it brief. Also, I apologize if this is a bit dull, but I feel it is important to disclose some information about myself in order to help you answer my questions.

General

Age: 24
Nationality: Dual U.S. and Belgian citizenship
Languages: English and Spanish

Education

School: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (U.S.)
Degree: BS in Accounting - May 2007
GPA: 3.2/4.0
GMAT: N/A

Professional Experience:

Deloitte & Touche, LLP - Audit [New York, NY]
Financial Security Assurance - Financial Reporting [New York, NY]

I stumbled onto this site a few weeks ago on a whim and was surprised to find such helpful advice. Since then, I have done a considerable amount of research into business schools across Europe. I have narrowed my search to the following 10 programs, in no particular order:

1 EADA - International Master in Finance
2 EDHEC - MSc in Finance, MSc in Capital Markets
3 SDA Bocconi - Master in Corporate Finance
4 Rotterdam School of Management - Masters in Financial Management
5 ESADE - MSc in Finance
6 CERAM - MSc in International Finance, MSc in Financial Markets
7 City University: Cass - MSc in Investment Management, MSc in Banking & International Finance
8 Vlerick Leuven Gent - Masters in Finance
9 International University of Monaco - Masters in Finance
10 London School of Economics and Political Science - MSc in Finance

This may look like quite an exhaustive list, but it has taken me countless hours of research to narrow it down this far.

How would you rate these schools in terms of academic quality?

I am trying to determine my chances of admission to some of these programs. I am anticipating a GMAT score in the 680-720 range, based on practice test results.

My experience, both academically and professionally are restricted to accounting and audit work. As an undergraduate, I decided this would be a solid foundation for me to begin my career and knew that I would eventually obtain a post graduate degree in finance.

My experience with Deloitte was in the Audit: Financial Services group, where I had exposure to several global banking organizations [The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, Morgan Stanley, Natixis]. I held an internship during school and was subsequently offered a full time position.

Unfortunately, I was laid off in September, as were many of my colleagues. Luckily, I was able to quickly find a position at FSA - a financial guaranty insurance company - and have been there for about six months.

I am leaning towards Barcelona - in particular, EADA. I feel that ESADE may be too selective for my credentials.

Should I be aiming lower/higher?

Cost is a factor, but then again so is location, quality of education, recognition and accreditation, CFA partnership, etc...

Also - as I am seeking a career change, I assume it is best to select a Masters program, rather than an MBA. In my research, I have found that most MBA programs are for more qualified and experienced candidates. Perhaps I am wrong?

Please provide any feedback, its getting late and I may not be as clear as I would like to be - but any commentary would be appreciated and hopefully it will spark some new thoughts/ideas.

Thanks,
Eric


If you're interested in business school, you'd have a pretty strong profile too. Just that you'd have to differentiate yourself from other caucasian finance guys through your essays (your dual citizenship is good stuff)

<blockquote>Hello,

Thanks in advance to anyone who takes the time to read this - I will try to keep it brief. Also, I apologize if this is a bit dull, but I feel it is important to disclose some information about myself in order to help you answer my questions.

General

Age: 24
Nationality: Dual U.S. and Belgian citizenship
Languages: English and Spanish

Education

School: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (U.S.)
Degree: BS in Accounting - May 2007
GPA: 3.2/4.0
GMAT: N/A

Professional Experience:

Deloitte & Touche, LLP - Audit [New York, NY]
Financial Security Assurance - Financial Reporting [New York, NY]

I stumbled onto this site a few weeks ago on a whim and was surprised to find such helpful advice. Since then, I have done a considerable amount of research into business schools across Europe. I have narrowed my search to the following 10 programs, in no particular order:

1 EADA - International Master in Finance
2 EDHEC - MSc in Finance, MSc in Capital Markets
3 SDA Bocconi - Master in Corporate Finance
4 Rotterdam School of Management - Masters in Financial Management
5 ESADE - MSc in Finance
6 CERAM - MSc in International Finance, MSc in Financial Markets
7 City University: Cass - MSc in Investment Management, MSc in Banking & International Finance
8 Vlerick Leuven Gent - Masters in Finance
9 International University of Monaco - Masters in Finance
10 London School of Economics and Political Science - MSc in Finance

This may look like quite an exhaustive list, but it has taken me countless hours of research to narrow it down this far.

How would you rate these schools in terms of academic quality?

I am trying to determine my chances of admission to some of these programs. I am anticipating a GMAT score in the 680-720 range, based on practice test results.

My experience, both academically and professionally are restricted to accounting and audit work. As an undergraduate, I decided this would be a solid foundation for me to begin my career and knew that I would eventually obtain a post graduate degree in finance.

My experience with Deloitte was in the Audit: Financial Services group, where I had exposure to several global banking organizations [The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, Morgan Stanley, Natixis]. I held an internship during school and was subsequently offered a full time position.

Unfortunately, I was laid off in September, as were many of my colleagues. Luckily, I was able to quickly find a position at FSA - a financial guaranty insurance company - and have been there for about six months.

I am leaning towards Barcelona - in particular, EADA. I feel that ESADE may be too selective for my credentials.

Should I be aiming lower/higher?

Cost is a factor, but then again so is location, quality of education, recognition and accreditation, CFA partnership, etc...

Also - as I am seeking a career change, I assume it is best to select a Masters program, rather than an MBA. In my research, I have found that most MBA programs are for more qualified and experienced candidates. Perhaps I am wrong?

Please provide any feedback, its getting late and I may not be as clear as I would like to be - but any commentary would be appreciated and hopefully it will spark some new thoughts/ideas.

Thanks,
Eric</blockquote>

If you're interested in business school, you'd have a pretty strong profile too. Just that you'd have to differentiate yourself from other caucasian finance guys through your essays (your dual citizenship is good stuff)
quote
allianzg

Hi alianzg,

I also applied to HEC Msc. Finance program but haven't heard from them yet. If I were you I would go with ESADE. A friend of mine goes to Cass and he is not terribly excited with the program and his career prospects. Besides, Barcelona is very nice. ;) Have you heard anything from HEC?


I haven't heard anything from HEC yet. I am quite sure that I am not going to receive an offer though, as my GMAT score is just 640. I have accepted ESADE's offer and paid the reservation fee.

<blockquote>Hi alianzg,

I also applied to HEC Msc. Finance program but haven't heard from them yet. If I were you I would go with ESADE. A friend of mine goes to Cass and he is not terribly excited with the program and his career prospects. Besides, Barcelona is very nice. ;) Have you heard anything from HEC?</blockquote>

I haven't heard anything from HEC yet. I am quite sure that I am not going to receive an offer though, as my GMAT score is just 640. I have accepted ESADE's offer and paid the reservation fee.
quote
mindstew

Mine is 100+ points higher but I am not holding my breath either. It's late in the process and I went to a small private college for my undergradute - the adcom definitely never heard of it. Good luck in Barcelona, I am sure you are going to love it there.

Mine is 100+ points higher but I am not holding my breath either. It's late in the process and I went to a small private college for my undergradute - the adcom definitely never heard of it. Good luck in Barcelona, I am sure you are going to love it there.
quote
allianzg

Congrats on your GMAT score then. :)

I am going to give it another shot in august, so I would really appreciate it if you could tell me how you prepared for the test.

And of course, gl with HEC. I hope you make it!

Congrats on your GMAT score then. :)

I am going to give it another shot in august, so I would really appreciate it if you could tell me how you prepared for the test.

And of course, gl with HEC. I hope you make it!
quote
mindstew

Congrats on your GMAT score then. :)

I am going to give it another shot in august, so I would really appreciate it if you could tell me how you prepared for the test.

And of course, gl with HEC. I hope you make it!


Official guides (all three of them), Manhattan GMAT SC and Number properties guides (extremely helpful) and that's it. Also, make sure you do gmatprep at least 5 times before the exam.

<blockquote>Congrats on your GMAT score then. :)

I am going to give it another shot in august, so I would really appreciate it if you could tell me how you prepared for the test.

And of course, gl with HEC. I hope you make it! </blockquote>

Official guides (all three of them), Manhattan GMAT SC and Number properties guides (extremely helpful) and that's it. Also, make sure you do gmatprep at least 5 times before the exam.
quote
tuscan21

Manhattan GMAT books are indeed very helpful. I regret not having bought them earlier because they have improved both my verbal and quant capabilities. Start with them and then solve and study a lot of problems from the OG books. Focus on quality rather on quantity by studying representative questions in depth. Good luck to everyone applying!

Manhattan GMAT books are indeed very helpful. I regret not having bought them earlier because they have improved both my verbal and quant capabilities. Start with them and then solve and study a lot of problems from the OG books. Focus on quality rather on quantity by studying representative questions in depth. Good luck to everyone applying!
quote
allianzg

My LSE application status just changed to: "A decision has been made..."

Should I smile or cry? :O

I'm so nervous right now!

My LSE application status just changed to: "A decision has been made..."

Should I smile or cry? :O

I'm so nervous right now!
quote

My LSE application status just changed to: "A decision has been made..."

Should I smile or cry? :O

I'm so nervous right now!


Any luck buddy? It is quiet Scary isn't it? Well! don't get discouraged though. There are other schools out there.

<blockquote>My LSE application status just changed to: "A decision has been made..."

Should I smile or cry? :O

I'm so nervous right now!</blockquote>

Any luck buddy? It is quiet Scary isn't it? Well! don't get discouraged though. There are other schools out there.
quote

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