Modular EMBA?


Hello everybody, I recently got my GMAT (score: 720, Q49, V38, IR8) and started looking for potential EMBAs. I am based in Milan, Italy and work in wealth management. The "obvious" choice would be Bocconi due to location, but since I have a certain flexibility with my job I would like to explore some more international options with a suitable format. I can take, say, 1-2 full weeks every 2-3 months.
For example, I found HEC's January and February tracks, which have 5-6 modules of 5-9 days each over a period of 15-18 months.
What other "modular" EMBAs would you suggest?

Hello everybody, I recently got my GMAT (score: 720, Q49, V38, IR8) and started looking for potential EMBAs. I am based in Milan, Italy and work in wealth management. The "obvious" choice would be Bocconi due to location, but since I have a certain flexibility with my job I would like to explore some more international options with a suitable format. I can take, say, 1-2 full weeks every 2-3 months.
For example, I found HEC's January and February tracks, which have 5-6 modules of 5-9 days each over a period of 15-18 months.
What other "modular" EMBAs would you suggest?
quote
Duncan

Escp in Torino is part of the European track of its EMBA. What are your goals?

Escp in Torino is part of the European track of its EMBA. What are your goals?
quote

Escp in Torino is part of the European track of its EMBA. What are your goals?


Hi Duncan, I am having a closer look at ESCP as their program looks quite suitable to me and the itinerant track is very attractive. I have been surfing b-schools' website for some days and found out also HEC, IE and Imperial College which could be feasible. IE in particular has a mainly distance-learning format with just a few visits to Madrid (even though my perception is on-campus MBAs are still more expendable, aren't they?). 
As to my goals, the primary one is a career change or at least a "call option" for it. I have been in wealth management for 12 years, but I started being a bit tired and annoyed by some features of my job, namely: 1. overwhelming commercial pressure; 2. extremely individualistic job (disguised as a team job); 3. "bidimensional" thinking (i.e. everything is about AUM and revenues). I would like to deal with something less commercial and more intellectually challenging. The good part is the large flexibility I have, which allows me to consider an EMBA outside Milan/Italy. 
However I am looking for a b-school with a good network and connections in Italy, as for family reasons I won't be able to move abroad after the EMBA (I spent 7 years in London and just came back). 
One more point I would like to understand better is the potential compared to my starting point: as a banker I am probably in the upper range in terms of salary pre-EMBA. Provided my main goal is a career change, can I also improve on the economic side? I have some colleagues who took an MBA and ended up doing the same job I already have.. 

[quote]Escp in Torino is part of the European track of its EMBA. What are your goals? [/quote]<br><br>Hi Duncan,&nbsp;I am having a closer look at ESCP as their program looks quite suitable to me and the itinerant track is very attractive. I have been surfing b-schools' website for some days and found out also HEC, IE and Imperial College which could be feasible. IE in particular has a mainly distance-learning format with just a few visits to Madrid (even though my perception is on-campus MBAs are still more expendable, aren't they?).&nbsp;<br>As to my goals, the primary one is a career change or at least a "call option" for it. I have been in wealth management for 12 years, but I started being a bit tired and annoyed by some features of my job, namely: 1. overwhelming commercial pressure; 2. extremely individualistic job (disguised as a team job); 3. "bidimensional" thinking (i.e. everything is about AUM and revenues). I would like to deal with something less commercial and more intellectually challenging. The good part is the large flexibility I have, which allows me to consider an EMBA outside Milan/Italy.&nbsp;<br>However I am looking for a b-school with a good network and connections in Italy, as for family reasons I won't be able to move abroad after the EMBA (I spent 7 years in London and just came back).&nbsp;<br>One more point I would like to understand better is the potential compared to my starting point: as a banker I am probably in the upper range in terms of salary pre-EMBA. Provided my main goal is a career change, can I also improve on the economic side? I have some colleagues who took an MBA and ended up doing the same job I already have..&nbsp;
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Duncan

As a rule of thumb, banks are highly profitable and pay high salaries. In a less commercial field, people tend to earn less than their peers in banks, even MBAs. You already knew that. Estimate how much pressure there is in your job relative to less commercial fields, divide by salary by that ratio to get X. Estimate the length of your working time relative to less commercial fields, and divide X by that ratio to get Y. Y is the number you should be framing options against, if you want to be in a less commercial setting and have better family life. Yes, as an MBA you will earn more than Y, and probably more than X. However, what you are buying is the option to change into many other career paths where you will be happier, live longer and make a bigger contribution to your family and clients. Of course as an entrepreneur you could certainly earn more than a wealth manager. 

If you are in Italy, really IE doesn't make sense. It's an edgy brand even in Spain, but in Italy you need Bocconi, Politecnio di Milan or ESCP Torino. Bologna Business School has some traction at HERA Group, Lamborghini and UniCredit. 





PS 
The only distance learning options that make sense are massively powerful brands, like the Harvard ALM. Even Imperial or Manchester... what do they really mean in Italy outside the finance sector? A top EMBA like HEC, IMD, Insead or LBS would be an option.

[Edited by Duncan on Sep 09, 2020]

As a rule of thumb, banks are highly profitable and pay high salaries. In a less commercial field, people tend to earn less than their peers in banks, even MBAs. You already knew that. Estimate how much pressure there is in your job relative to less commercial fields, divide by salary by that ratio to get X. Estimate the length of your working time relative to less commercial fields, and divide X by that ratio to get Y. Y is the number you should be framing options against, if you want to be in a less commercial setting and have better family life. Yes, as an MBA you will earn more than Y, and probably more than X. However, what you are buying is the option to change into many other career paths where you will be happier, live longer and make a bigger contribution to your family and clients. Of course as an entrepreneur you could certainly earn more than a wealth manager.&nbsp;<br><br>If you are in Italy, really IE doesn't make sense. It's an edgy brand even in Spain, but in Italy you need Bocconi, Politecnio di Milan or ESCP Torino. Bologna Business School has some traction at HERA Group, Lamborghini and UniCredit.&nbsp;<br><br><br><br><div></div><div>

PS&nbsp;
The only distance learning options that make sense are massively powerful brands, like the Harvard ALM. Even Imperial or Manchester... what do they really mean in Italy outside the finance sector? A top EMBA like HEC, IMD, Insead or LBS would be an option.</div>
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