2015 trends in Canadian MBA & Reputations question


appleseed

I am a Canadian citizen, engineering undergrad /w decent work experience, a balanced 680 GMAT (45Q, 35V) and above average extra-curriculars mainly related to sports.

Currently employed in the energy industry in Calgary but am looking to transition to energy-related finance. Part-time U of C Haskayne makes me the most obvious sense, however for personal development reasons, I am considering a 1 year MBA within Canada or abroad.

1) I would like some CURRENT feedback as to the reputations of Ivey, Queens & Rotman within the context of western Canada (how reputable are they in Western Canada) - are they perceived much better than a regional MBA such as UAlberta or Haskayne?

2) There have also been some conflicting information as to the declining reputation of Ivey, Queens & Rotman within Canada. I am wondering if there is any truth to that?

3) As well, I am curious to know how a tier 2 or 3 US or Asian based MBA would be perceived in Canada, compared to those three. Ex - HKUST, Nanyang, Texas A&M, etc.


Appreciate any input.

[Edited by appleseed on Apr 28, 2015]

I am a Canadian citizen, engineering undergrad /w decent work experience, a balanced 680 GMAT (45Q, 35V) and above average extra-curriculars mainly related to sports.

Currently employed in the energy industry in Calgary but am looking to transition to energy-related finance. Part-time U of C Haskayne makes me the most obvious sense, however for personal development reasons, I am considering a 1 year MBA within Canada or abroad.

1) I would like some CURRENT feedback as to the reputations of Ivey, Queens & Rotman within the context of western Canada (how reputable are they in Western Canada) - are they perceived much better than a regional MBA such as UAlberta or Haskayne?

2) There have also been some conflicting information as to the declining reputation of Ivey, Queens & Rotman within Canada. I am wondering if there is any truth to that?

3) As well, I am curious to know how a tier 2 or 3 US or Asian based MBA would be perceived in Canada, compared to those three. Ex - HKUST, Nanyang, Texas A&M, etc.


Appreciate any input.
quote
ralph

My gut feeling is that the energy companies in the region will mainly recruit from Alberta and Haskayne. And from a few searches on Linkedin, this does seem to be the case. However, since you're there you can check with the companies you'd be targeting post-MBA, to get a sense of where people did their MBAs.

The typical advice is to study where you want to work. This is not only because business schools tend to have more recruiters locally, but also because you yourself can more effectively network with firms in the area. Of course, it's not true that people always get placed locally, but I would say that a good majority do.

For instance, looking at Rotman grads on Linkedin, some 5200+ are in Toronto, with 89 listed in Calgary and only two in Alberta. Of course, these stats won't be completely accurate, but they do paint a decent picture of the situation.

Other schools outside the country will probably have similar outlooks. UNLESS of course the companies you're looking at appreciate international experience. Something that might interest them, maybe, is if you did a specialized MBA in energy finance: McCombs has an excellent program in this space. But exactly what these employers are looking, that's something you won't find here, you'll have to ask them yourselves.

I don't think that Rotman, Queen's, or Ivey are perceived much differently than they were in the past. Ivey has lost some ground in the FT ranking, but Rotman is still considered one of the best schools in the country.

FYI Rotman only offers a two-year MBA.

My gut feeling is that the energy companies in the region will mainly recruit from Alberta and Haskayne. And from a few searches on Linkedin, this does seem to be the case. However, since you're there you can check with the companies you'd be targeting post-MBA, to get a sense of where people did their MBAs.

The typical advice is to study where you want to work. This is not only because business schools tend to have more recruiters locally, but also because you yourself can more effectively network with firms in the area. Of course, it's not true that people always get placed locally, but I would say that a good majority do.

For instance, looking at Rotman grads on Linkedin, some 5200+ are in Toronto, with 89 listed in Calgary and only two in Alberta. Of course, these stats won't be completely accurate, but they do paint a decent picture of the situation.

Other schools outside the country will probably have similar outlooks. UNLESS of course the companies you're looking at appreciate international experience. Something that might interest them, maybe, is if you did a specialized MBA in energy finance: McCombs has an excellent program in this space. But exactly what these employers are looking, that's something you won't find here, you'll have to ask them yourselves.

I don't think that Rotman, Queen's, or Ivey are perceived much differently than they were in the past. Ivey has lost some ground in the FT ranking, but Rotman is still considered one of the best schools in the country.

FYI Rotman only offers a two-year MBA.
quote
Pia_11

Hi Ralph,

I am an Indian girl with 4 years of work experience in social enterprises; working with corporates for CSR, nonprofts in Business Development domain and currently a social entrepreneur working for women empowerment.
I scored a 600 on GMAT (Q37, V35, IR5, AWA5). I wish to apply this month for fall admission in good business schools in Canada. I am looking at UBC, York but really confused where else to apply. Could you please recommend me where should I apply with my background and current GMAT score?

My gut feeling is that the energy companies in the region will mainly recruit from Alberta and Haskayne. And from a few searches on Linkedin, this does seem to be the case. However, since you're there you can check with the companies you'd be targeting post-MBA, to get a sense of where people did their MBAs.

The typical advice is to study where you want to work. This is not only because business schools tend to have more recruiters locally, but also because you yourself can more effectively network with firms in the area. Of course, it's not true that people always get placed locally, but I would say that a good majority do.

For instance, looking at Rotman grads on Linkedin, some 5200+ are in Toronto, with 89 listed in Calgary and only two in Alberta. Of course, these stats won't be completely accurate, but they do paint a decent picture of the situation.

Other schools outside the country will probably have similar outlooks. UNLESS of course the companies you're looking at appreciate international experience. Something that might interest them, maybe, is if you did a specialized MBA in energy finance: McCombs has an excellent program in this space. But exactly what these employers are looking, that's something you won't find here, you'll have to ask them yourselves.

I don't think that Rotman, Queen's, or Ivey are perceived much differently than they were in the past. Ivey has lost some ground in the FT ranking, but Rotman is still considered one of the best schools in the country.

FYI Rotman only offers a two-year MBA.

Hi Ralph,

I am an Indian girl with 4 years of work experience in social enterprises; working with corporates for CSR, nonprofts in Business Development domain and currently a social entrepreneur working for women empowerment.
I scored a 600 on GMAT (Q37, V35, IR5, AWA5). I wish to apply this month for fall admission in good business schools in Canada. I am looking at UBC, York but really confused where else to apply. Could you please recommend me where should I apply with my background and current GMAT score?

[quote]My gut feeling is that the energy companies in the region will mainly recruit from Alberta and Haskayne. And from a few searches on Linkedin, this does seem to be the case. However, since you're there you can check with the companies you'd be targeting post-MBA, to get a sense of where people did their MBAs.

The typical advice is to study where you want to work. This is not only because business schools tend to have more recruiters locally, but also because you yourself can more effectively network with firms in the area. Of course, it's not true that people always get placed locally, but I would say that a good majority do.

For instance, looking at Rotman grads on Linkedin, some 5200+ are in Toronto, with 89 listed in Calgary and only two in Alberta. Of course, these stats won't be completely accurate, but they do paint a decent picture of the situation.

Other schools outside the country will probably have similar outlooks. UNLESS of course the companies you're looking at appreciate international experience. Something that might interest them, maybe, is if you did a specialized MBA in energy finance: McCombs has an excellent program in this space. But exactly what these employers are looking, that's something you won't find here, you'll have to ask them yourselves.

I don't think that Rotman, Queen's, or Ivey are perceived much differently than they were in the past. Ivey has lost some ground in the FT ranking, but Rotman is still considered one of the best schools in the country.

FYI Rotman only offers a two-year MBA.[/quote]
quote
mba hipste...

I would say that Schulich and UBC would be reach schools for you given your 600 GMAT score. You might consider applying to a school with a lower average GMAT as a safety - Ryerson, maybe?

I would say that Schulich and UBC would be reach schools for you given your 600 GMAT score. You might consider applying to a school with a lower average GMAT as a safety - Ryerson, maybe?
quote

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