B-School recommendations for my profile


Hi -

I am a graduate from India's premier commerce college (Sri Ram College of Commerce) working at a Big 4 audit firm for the last 3 years. Through my tenure I have been promoted twice and am currently designated as a senior. During the past year I appeared for the GMAT thrice, getting scores of 620, 640 and 640. I had been fairly well prepared but failed to score well in the actual exam. I am not very keen to write the exam once again, and was wondering if someone could assist me in the MBA application process. I intend to apply to the following schools:

1. Indian School of Business
2. Singapore Management University
3. Asian Institute of Management
4. National University of Singapore
5. Hong-Kong Business School
6. INSEAD Singapore

A candid response regarding the prospects of converting my application would be really helpful. Also, any additional inputs, for example alternate b-schools, miscellaneous suggestions, are welcome.

Thank you.
Hi -

I am a graduate from India's premier commerce college (Sri Ram College of Commerce) working at a Big 4 audit firm for the last 3 years. Through my tenure I have been promoted twice and am currently designated as a senior. During the past year I appeared for the GMAT thrice, getting scores of 620, 640 and 640. I had been fairly well prepared but failed to score well in the actual exam. I am not very keen to write the exam once again, and was wondering if someone could assist me in the MBA application process. I intend to apply to the following schools:

1. Indian School of Business
2. Singapore Management University
3. Asian Institute of Management
4. National University of Singapore
5. Hong-Kong Business School
6. INSEAD Singapore

A candid response regarding the prospects of converting my application would be really helpful. Also, any additional inputs, for example alternate b-schools, miscellaneous suggestions, are welcome.

Thank you.
quote
ralph
Your GMAT score is on the low side for most of those schools - although that doesn't put you out of the game. I'd recommend choosing two or three from that list (depending on where you want to end up after graduation) and then padding with several safety schools. Maybe City University of Hong Kong, Peking, or the Chinese University of Hong Kong?
Your GMAT score is on the low side for most of those schools - although that doesn't put you out of the game. I'd recommend choosing two or three from that list (depending on where you want to end up after graduation) and then padding with several safety schools. Maybe City University of Hong Kong, Peking, or the Chinese University of Hong Kong?
quote
Ralph - Thank you for your inputs. Just wanted to add something to the discussion and subsequently get your thoughts around it:

Most of the colleges on the aforementioned list, with the exception of Indian School of Business and INSEAD Singapore, have an average GMAT score of 660 (per 2012 applicants data uploaded in the respective college's website). To determine a range of scores that the respective schools would consider for applicants, I added/subtracted 30 points from the average, landing me to a number around my GMAT score. Could you confirm whether this methodology is reasonable from the application standpoint, or am i missing something crucial. Additionally, based on your experience of student applicant profiles, where do you feel I stand from an application stand point. Apart from my work-experience I am an avid tennis player and golfer, and play the drums with a rock band. To give you more information about my academics, I received 95% (almost equivalent to a 3.9/4 GPA) marks in my 12th grade and passed with a distinction in college. Does this education background by any chance mitigate a bit of the negativity springing up on account of the lesser than average GMAT score.

Thanks again.
Ralph - Thank you for your inputs. Just wanted to add something to the discussion and subsequently get your thoughts around it:

Most of the colleges on the aforementioned list, with the exception of Indian School of Business and INSEAD Singapore, have an average GMAT score of 660 (per 2012 applicants data uploaded in the respective college's website). To determine a range of scores that the respective schools would consider for applicants, I added/subtracted 30 points from the average, landing me to a number around my GMAT score. Could you confirm whether this methodology is reasonable from the application standpoint, or am i missing something crucial. Additionally, based on your experience of student applicant profiles, where do you feel I stand from an application stand point. Apart from my work-experience I am an avid tennis player and golfer, and play the drums with a rock band. To give you more information about my academics, I received 95% (almost equivalent to a 3.9/4 GPA) marks in my 12th grade and passed with a distinction in college. Does this education background by any chance mitigate a bit of the negativity springing up on account of the lesser than average GMAT score.

Thanks again.
quote
Duncan
Take a look at http://www.find-mba.com/board/27082 I understand that you think that your background is worth a 30 point bonus, but actually the other applicants at these schools also have great background. There's in fact a substantial GMAT premium for Indians at many schools.
Take a look at http://www.find-mba.com/board/27082 I understand that you think that your background is worth a 30 point bonus, but actually the other applicants at these schools also have great background. There's in fact a substantial GMAT premium for Indians at many schools.
quote
Duncan - Though I agree to you cent percent, I am eager to apply. I don't feel that failure to achieve a certain target in one exam is definitive of my abilities. As I am clearer about my weaknesses, I shall try and work around it. Appreciate your help.

Thanks!
Duncan - Though I agree to you cent percent, I am eager to apply. I don't feel that failure to achieve a certain target in one exam is definitive of my abilities. As I am clearer about my weaknesses, I shall try and work around it. Appreciate your help.

Thanks!
quote
Duncan
I realise that you think that your GMAT is not representative of your abilities, however an admissions manager will think that is does reflect your current capacity to accomplish verbal and quant tasks. Those are the central elements of MBA success and, therefore, there's no reason why a top tier school like INSEAD would recruit someone with such a low GMAT if they knew someone with a 700+ GMAT would find the course more suited to them and the employment options that result.

Not all of your schools are in GMAT Tier One, and I am not sure what Hong-Kong Business School is, but I suggest you aim at GMAT Tier Four, with one or two 'stretch' schools, as Ralph has recommended.
I realise that you think that your GMAT is not representative of your abilities, however an admissions manager will think that is does reflect your current capacity to accomplish verbal and quant tasks. Those are the central elements of MBA success and, therefore, there's no reason why a top tier school like INSEAD would recruit someone with such a low GMAT if they knew someone with a 700+ GMAT would find the course more suited to them and the employment options that result.

Not all of your schools are in GMAT Tier One, and I am not sure what Hong-Kong Business School is, but I suggest you aim at GMAT Tier Four, with one or two 'stretch' schools, as Ralph has recommended.
quote
Duncan - I agree with your suggestion of not applying to INSEAD and Indian School of Business. I researched on their average GMAT criteria, and it rightly exceeds my GMAT score by a margin. I have decided not to apply to those institutions and focus my effort elsewhere. If there are some institutions that you feel would be more suited do let me know. Also, do you feel giving another shot at GMAT makes sense?

Thanks.
Duncan - I agree with your suggestion of not applying to INSEAD and Indian School of Business. I researched on their average GMAT criteria, and it rightly exceeds my GMAT score by a margin. I have decided not to apply to those institutions and focus my effort elsewhere. If there are some institutions that you feel would be more suited do let me know. Also, do you feel giving another shot at GMAT makes sense?

Thanks.
quote
Duncan
Unless you change your GMAT strategy, you will probably get a similar score.
Unless you change your GMAT strategy, you will probably get a similar score.
quote
Do you have any suggestions as to how I should go about the exam? Also, whether schools build opinions around applicants who apply multiple times for the exam.

Thanks!
Do you have any suggestions as to how I should go about the exam? Also, whether schools build opinions around applicants who apply multiple times for the exam.

Thanks!
quote
Duncan
No, there's a lot of discussion on the GMAT discussion board and I have nothing to add to that. Personally, I used a book with a CD and just redid the test over and over, using the feedback from the test to focus my time. Where possible, do full-length tests at the same time of day as the tests at your local GMAT centre.

Generally, a school will expect a small increase with each sitting; a good student should put on 20 at each sitting with litte work.
No, there's a lot of discussion on the GMAT discussion board and I have nothing to add to that. Personally, I used a book with a CD and just redid the test over and over, using the feedback from the test to focus my time. Where possible, do full-length tests at the same time of day as the tests at your local GMAT centre.

Generally, a school will expect a small increase with each sitting; a good student should put on 20 at each sitting with litte work.
quote
ralph
Do you have any suggestions as to how I should go about the exam?

What's been your strategy up to this point? Like Duncan says, using a book and practice tests can help, but if you're not self-motivated then this can be tough.

Otherwise, there are a range of test-prep options, from classroom-based to one-on-one tutoring. The costs can vary, but some applicants find that these are worth the investment.


Also, whether schools build opinions around applicants who apply multiple times for the exam.

If you're able to improve your score substantially in the next round then I don't think it will be a problem - but more tries than that without improvement might be looked at negatively.
<blockquote>Do you have any suggestions as to how I should go about the exam?</blockquote>
What's been your strategy up to this point? Like Duncan says, using a book and practice tests can help, but if you're not self-motivated then this can be tough.

Otherwise, there are a range of test-prep options, from classroom-based to one-on-one tutoring. The costs can vary, but some applicants find that these are worth the investment.


<blockquote>Also, whether schools build opinions around applicants who apply multiple times for the exam.</blockquote>
If you're able to improve your score substantially in the next round then I don't think it will be a problem - but more tries than that without improvement might be looked at negatively.
quote

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