Admission at HFU Business School- MBA (IBM)


Arup Das

My name is Arup and I'm 43 yrs old and currently based in India.I'm a Science graduate and have done my Post Graduate Diploma in Management studies. I have 15 years of work experience in the Garment Retail Industry. I have received an admission letter from HFU Business School for their 3 semester MBA in International Business Management. I have few queries and shall really appreciate if someone can respond and guide me..

1) How is MBA-IBM program from HFU Business school in terms of employ ability in Germany, will i be able to find a placement/job

2) Does the FIBAA accreditation for HFU School have any impact in the employability compared with the other schools that have AACSB, EQUIS or AMBA accreditation?

3)Do the School have a good German language training program?

4) Will there be challenges in finding job at the age of 45 in Germany?

Regards
Arup

My name is Arup and I'm 43 yrs old and currently based in India.I'm a Science graduate and have done my Post Graduate Diploma in Management studies. I have 15 years of work experience in the Garment Retail Industry. I have received an admission letter from HFU Business School for their 3 semester MBA in International Business Management. I have few queries and shall really appreciate if someone can respond and guide me..

1) How is MBA-IBM program from HFU Business school in terms of employ ability in Germany, will i be able to find a placement/job

2) Does the FIBAA accreditation for HFU School have any impact in the employability compared with the other schools that have AACSB, EQUIS or AMBA accreditation?

3)Do the School have a good German language training program?

4) Will there be challenges in finding job at the age of 45 in Germany?

Regards
Arup
quote
Duncan

Employment  will hinge on your language skills and your acculturation.  It's a prosperous region, but the roles available are limited. I guess that's why the MBA is so small. I imagine that if you have strong German  you can  get a similar role to HFU undergraduates.  

FIBBA accreditation doesn't matter much. 

I just looked at the languages courses on that campus. It looks like 1.5 hours a week. You won't get very far at that tempo. 

For an MBA level role you will need a much better school and fluent German. However, you might be content with a more modest role than the one you have now. Germany is a good place to be and the region has a great quality of living.

Employment&nbsp; will hinge on your language skills and your acculturation.&nbsp; It's a prosperous region, but the roles available are limited. I guess that's why the MBA is so small. I imagine that if you have strong German&nbsp; you can&nbsp; get a similar role to HFU undergraduates.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br><br>FIBBA accreditation doesn't matter much.&nbsp;<br><br>I just looked at the languages courses on that campus. It looks like 1.5 hours a week. You won't get very far at that tempo.&nbsp;<br><br>For an MBA level role you will need a much better school and fluent German. However, you might be content with a more modest role than the one you have now. Germany is a good place to be and the region has a great quality of living.
quote
mba hipste...

To elaborate, finding MBA-level work in Germany will almost certainly require perfect German skills. You will not be able to gain this level of fluency during a full-time MBA.

If your goals include transitioning to Germany after the MBA, it would be better to spend a year or two with some intensive language learning before you start the program. But then the issue will become, if you can speak German at a high level, maybe it's better to do a German-language program. 

If as Duncan suggests you are looking for a more modest role in Germany - a non-management role, so to speak - that's a possibility. But, whether an MBA will help with that - and will be worth the investment - is a different matter. I believe the country does offer what they call "freelance" visas, which allow you to live and work there as long as you have a sustainable income through self-employment. Aiming for something like that might be a much more affordable option than doing an MBA. 

To elaborate, finding MBA-level work in Germany will almost certainly require perfect German skills. You will not be able to gain this level of fluency during a full-time MBA.<br><br>If your goals include transitioning to Germany after the MBA, it would be better to spend a year or two with some intensive language learning before you start the program. But then the issue will become, if you can speak German at a high level, maybe it's better to do a German-language program.&nbsp;<br><br>If as Duncan suggests you are looking for a more modest role in Germany - a non-management role, so to speak - that's a possibility. But, whether an MBA will help with that - and will be worth the investment - is a different matter. I believe the country does offer what they call "freelance" visas, which allow you to live and work there as long as you have a sustainable income through self-employment. Aiming for something like that might be a much more affordable option than doing an MBA.&nbsp;
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