Canadian MBAs: working experience requirements


Shah12312

Hello,

I'm a Pakistani BBA graduate and I'm looking forward to pursue an MBA from Canada. I came to know that I need 2 years of working experience before I can apply to a Canadian university for MBA. I have 2 years of working experience but in Pakistan (It's not Canadian experience) so I wonder am I still eligible for joining MBA in a Canadian university.

Any help will be highly appreciated! Thanks.

Hello,

I'm a Pakistani BBA graduate and I'm looking forward to pursue an MBA from Canada. I came to know that I need 2 years of working experience before I can apply to a Canadian university for MBA. I have 2 years of working experience but in Pakistan (It's not Canadian experience) so I wonder am I still eligible for joining MBA in a Canadian university.

Any help will be highly appreciated! Thanks.
quote
smartcanad...

International work experience (Pakistan or elsewhere) is ok for getting into MBA programs in Canada. Canadian work experience only matters if/when you start looking for a job in the Canadian job market, as that is what employers prefer.

Also check with the schools you are applying to if they will consider your Pakistani degree (and grades) as equivalent to a Canadian bachelors degree. Some (but not all) schools are a bit strict with their degree and minimum grade requirements. Better ask before you submit your application to avoid wasting time and money.

[Edited by smartcanada on Jan 03, 2020]

International work experience (Pakistan or elsewhere) is ok for getting into MBA programs in Canada. Canadian work experience only matters if/when you start looking for a job in the Canadian job market, as that is what employers prefer.

Also check with the schools you are applying to if they will consider your Pakistani degree (and grades) as equivalent to a Canadian bachelors degree. Some (but not all) schools are a bit strict with their degree and minimum grade requirements. Better ask before you submit your application to avoid wasting time and money.

quote
Ayon

Canada - like Australia and US attracts lot of immigrants from across the world. Canadian schools, like any other, will gladly accept your Pakistani work experience and tuition fee. After graduation however recruiters will look for specific cases of Canadian work experience or a highly sought after technical skill set.

The brand name of MBA program will aid. Think Rotman, Ivey, Queens, Sauder, McGill, Schulich, HEC, Concordia. The onus will be on you to prove and convince the recruiter about your transferable skillsets. Getting an internship or a Co-op will be paramount in convincing the recruiter about your abilities to work in a different / western culture and give you much talked/hyped about Canadian experience.

Canada - like Australia and US attracts lot of immigrants from across the world. Canadian schools, like any other, will gladly accept your Pakistani work experience and tuition fee. After graduation however recruiters will look for specific cases of Canadian work experience or a highly sought after technical skill set.

The brand name of MBA program will aid. Think Rotman, Ivey, Queens, Sauder, McGill, Schulich, HEC, Concordia. The onus will be on you to prove and convince the recruiter about your transferable skillsets. Getting an internship or a Co-op will be paramount in convincing the recruiter about your abilities to work in a different / western culture and give you much talked/hyped about Canadian experience.
quote
Shah12312

International work experience (Pakistan or elsewhere) is ok for getting into MBA programs in Canada. Canadian work experience only matters if/when you start looking for a job in the Canadian job market, as that is what employers prefer.

Also check with the schools you are applying to if they will consider your Pakistani degree (and grades) as equivalent to a Canadian bachelors degree. Some (but not all) schools are a bit strict with their degree and minimum grade requirements. Better ask before you submit your application to avoid wasting time and money.



Thanks for the response! I wonder if someone can work in Canada without pursuing a Canadian degree? In other words, can someone get a job in Canada with a Pakistani degree (In fields such as Computer Science, business management etc)?

[Edited by Shah12312 on Jan 05, 2020]

[quote]International work experience (Pakistan or elsewhere) is ok for getting into MBA programs in Canada. Canadian work experience only matters if/when you start looking for a job in the Canadian job market, as that is what employers prefer.

Also check with the schools you are applying to if they will consider your Pakistani degree (and grades) as equivalent to a Canadian bachelors degree. Some (but not all) schools are a bit strict with their degree and minimum grade requirements. Better ask before you submit your application to avoid wasting time and money.

[/quote]

Thanks for the response! I wonder if someone can work in Canada without pursuing a Canadian degree? In other words, can someone get a job in Canada with a Pakistani degree (In fields such as Computer Science, business management etc)?
quote
smartcanad...



Thanks for the response! I wonder if someone can work in Canada without pursuing a Canadian degree? In other words, can someone get a job in Canada with a Pakistani degree (In fields such as Computer Science, business management etc)?


Without Canadian PR/citizenship - zero chance unless you are a superstar (e.g. Olympic medalist, Nobel Prize winner, NBA/NHL/MLB player, rich investor)

With Canadian PR/citizenship - yes, it is possible, a lot of new immigrants get good jobs in Canada without a Canadian degree. On the other hand, a lot of immigrants also fail and go back to their home countries. Everyone is different - I cannot really generalize. In my own biased guesstimate, I see an equal proportion of immigrants succeeding and failing (50/50).

Without Canadian PR/citizenship but with Canadian MBA - you have a very good chance.
You will qualify for a work permit after graduating. Also, with a Canadian MBA, at least you have a rough idea on your odds of employment and what type of jobs/salaries you might get based on the school's employment reports. Schools also help train international students on how to navigate the Canadian work culture.

[quote]

Thanks for the response! I wonder if someone can work in Canada without pursuing a Canadian degree? In other words, can someone get a job in Canada with a Pakistani degree (In fields such as Computer Science, business management etc)?
[/quote]

Without Canadian PR/citizenship - zero chance unless you are a superstar (e.g. Olympic medalist, Nobel Prize winner, NBA/NHL/MLB player, rich investor)

With Canadian PR/citizenship - yes, it is possible, a lot of new immigrants get good jobs in Canada without a Canadian degree. On the other hand, a lot of immigrants also fail and go back to their home countries. Everyone is different - I cannot really generalize. In my own biased guesstimate, I see an equal proportion of immigrants succeeding and failing (50/50).

Without Canadian PR/citizenship but with Canadian MBA - you have a very good chance.
You will qualify for a work permit after graduating. Also, with a Canadian MBA, at least you have a rough idea on your odds of employment and what type of jobs/salaries you might get based on the school's employment reports. Schools also help train international students on how to navigate the Canadian work culture.
quote
laurie

I believe there are the equivalent of "skilled labor" visas that are awarded to immigrants based on the job situation in the country. However, they may be other requirements to this (have a certain number of years of education, and the means to support yourself.) I'm not exactly sure, but it's something to look into.

However, I tend to agree with the above - even in these cases where somebody has the legal right to work in the country, it might be tricky to actually land a job, that pays a decent wage. You'd probably have much better odds doing an MBA at a good, accredited school that has a network and career resources.

I believe there are the equivalent of "skilled labor" visas that are awarded to immigrants based on the job situation in the country. However, they may be other requirements to this (have a certain number of years of education, and the means to support yourself.) I'm not exactly sure, but it's something to look into.

However, I tend to agree with the above - even in these cases where somebody has the legal right to work in the country, it might be tricky to actually land a job, that pays a decent wage. You'd probably have much better odds doing an MBA at a good, accredited school that has a network and career resources.
quote
Sika

Have now lived here >10 years, came here as international MBA student just after the 2008/09 crisis, and can tell you not too worry too much about home country work ex- if you have a couple of years, jump on this opportunity…
Some of a “sad” reality is that Canada is very different from US, and local experience is very important.
My general advice is to move here when you don’t have a lot of experience- this would provide flexibility as you can start in a relatively junior role in your desired profession vs. somebody who has >5-10 yrs of experience that may not necessarily be valued as much

Have now lived here >10 years, came here as international MBA student just after the 2008/09 crisis, and can tell you not too worry too much about home country work ex- if you have a couple of years, jump on this opportunity…
Some of a “sad” reality is that Canada is very different from US, and local experience is very important.
My general advice is to move here when you don’t have a lot of experience- this would provide flexibility as you can start in a relatively junior role in your desired profession vs. somebody who has >5-10 yrs of experience that may not necessarily be valued as much
quote
mba hipste...

My general advice is to move here when you don’t have a lot of experience- this would provide flexibility as you can start in a relatively junior role in your desired profession vs. somebody who has >5-10 yrs of experience that may not necessarily be valued as much

Or, since this forum is aimed at MBA applicants, jump in with 5-6 years of work experience and then do an MBA at a strong school with good connections to industry: McGill, Rotman, Queen's, etc.

[quote]My general advice is to move here when you don’t have a lot of experience- this would provide flexibility as you can start in a relatively junior role in your desired profession vs. somebody who has >5-10 yrs of experience that may not necessarily be valued as much
[/quote]
Or, since this forum is aimed at MBA applicants, jump in with 5-6 years of work experience and then do an MBA at a strong school with good connections to industry: McGill, Rotman, Queen's, etc.
quote

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