Executive Assessment as an alternative to the GMAT


I'm looking at applying to some EMBA programs in the next year or so (Insead, LBS, IE Business School if it makes any difference) and all of these schools take the Executive Assessment as an alternative to the GMAT.

This is very appealing to me since it seems like it will take less time from all perspectives, from prep to actually sitting and taking the test. Very appealing, given my current work schedule.

Should I do it? Are there disadvantages to not taking the GMAT? I've read conflicting things in this sense: that EMBA don't rely too heavily on the GMAT, but also that it's disadvantageous NOT to take it at all (for example to seek waivers.)
I'm looking at applying to some EMBA programs in the next year or so (Insead, LBS, IE Business School if it makes any difference) and all of these schools take the Executive Assessment as an alternative to the GMAT.

This is very appealing to me since it seems like it will take less time from all perspectives, from prep to actually sitting and taking the test. Very appealing, given my current work schedule.

Should I do it? Are there disadvantages to not taking the GMAT? I've read conflicting things in this sense: that EMBA don't rely too heavily on the GMAT, but also that it's disadvantageous NOT to take it at all (for example to seek waivers.)
quote
Duncan
I think it's very similar to using a school-only test, like the ones that Manchester or Cranfield have. In practice, these tests help schools with three pools of candidates:
- women, who are more likely to self-exclude themselves from applicant pools
- Highly-desirable candidates, who struggle to find the time or motivation to complete the GMAT
- Lower value candidates, who perhaps would not perform well in the GMAT or in the MBA because they are not motivated to study despite wanting an MBA.

If you are a high-value candidate, whom the school would want despite the GMAT, then the assessment is enough. But if you are not a competitive candidate (or, for example, a competitive candidate applying rather late in the admissions cycle) then the GMAT will make you stand out as someone who is [a] not scared of numbers, as many GMAT-avoider are, or able to make time for the MBA.
I think it's very similar to using a school-only test, like the ones that Manchester or Cranfield have. In practice, these tests help schools with three pools of candidates:
- women, who are more likely to self-exclude themselves from applicant pools
- Highly-desirable candidates, who struggle to find the time or motivation to complete the GMAT
- Lower value candidates, who perhaps would not perform well in the GMAT or in the MBA because they are not motivated to study despite wanting an MBA.

If you are a high-value candidate, whom the school would want despite the GMAT, then the assessment is enough. But if you are not a competitive candidate (or, for example, a competitive candidate applying rather late in the admissions cycle) then the GMAT will make you stand out as someone who is [a] not scared of numbers, as many GMAT-avoider are, or [b] able to make time for the MBA.
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