Post MBA career jump.


brianna

Hey!

I want to do the MBA triple jump but I'm not sure which schools have graduates who've achieved this and have the curriculum and career services to support students who aim for this. I'm looking at MBA programs in Europe, specifically the UK, and Ireland because I don't speak any European languages. I always wanted to move to the Netherlands and was under the impression not long ago that since English was widely spoken in the country finding a job would not be so hard. But oh, how wrong I was. Tuition fees in Canada and the US are too high for me to be able to afford even with the help of student loans so I can't look at schools there. So, can I please get some advice on which schools would be good for a triple jump? But is a triple jump even possible?

Hey!

I want to do the MBA triple jump but I'm not sure which schools have graduates who've achieved this and have the curriculum and career services to support students who aim for this. I'm looking at MBA programs in Europe, specifically the UK, and Ireland because I don't speak any European languages. I always wanted to move to the Netherlands and was under the impression not long ago that since English was widely spoken in the country finding a job would not be so hard. But oh, how wrong I was. Tuition fees in Canada and the US are too high for me to be able to afford even with the help of student loans so I can't look at schools there. So, can I please get some advice on which schools would be good for a triple jump? But is a triple jump even possible?
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Duncan

Take a look at Best MBAs for international students' placement http://www.find-mba.com/board/41143 and Do you need to speak the local language? www.find-mba.com/board/34713

Take a look at Best MBAs for international students' placement http://www.find-mba.com/board/41143 and Do you need to speak the local language? www.find-mba.com/board/34713
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Duncan

Also, it's interesting to examine the assumption that you cannot afford a top MBA. Loans are available that will cover the full cost of attendance. As long as you are earning less than the average alumnus of the schools you can get into, then it's worth borrowing to get into a school with better outcomes. 

Forbes used to produce MBA rankins that focussed on the time it takes to get a return on investment. It's not a perfect method, and they had limited resources. So, the stopped the ranking. However, the 2019 results might give you some ideas:
https://www.businessbecause.com/news/mba-rankings/6377/forbes-mba-ranking-european-business-schools-offer-best-return-on-investment

Also, it's interesting to examine the assumption that you cannot afford a top MBA. Loans are available that will cover the full cost of attendance. As long as you are earning less than the average alumnus of the schools you can get into, then it's worth borrowing to get into a school with better outcomes.&nbsp;<br><br>Forbes used to produce MBA rankins that focussed on the time it takes to get a return on investment. It's not a perfect method, and they had limited resources. So, the stopped the ranking. However, the 2019 results might give you some ideas:<br>https://www.businessbecause.com/news/mba-rankings/6377/forbes-mba-ranking-european-business-schools-offer-best-return-on-investment
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brianna

Take a look at Best MBAs for international students' placement http://www.find-mba.com/board/41143 Do you need to speak the local language? www.find-mba.com/board/34713


I checked out the list and saw Hult International Business School there. When the UK has some of the top schools in the world, would an MBA from Hult hold strong in the job market? Also, I checked out the Hult website and found that their MBA program fee is GBP 64,000 which is a lot higher than AMBS, Warwick, and even slightly higher than Imperial. Could you help me understand why is that so? 

[quote]Take a look at Best MBAs for international students' placement&nbsp;http://www.find-mba.com/board/41143 Do you need to speak the local language?&nbsp;www.find-mba.com/board/34713 [/quote]<br><br>I checked out the list and saw Hult International Business School there. When the UK has some of the top schools in the world, would an MBA from Hult hold strong in the job market? Also, I checked out the Hult website and found that their MBA program fee is GBP 64,000 which is a lot higher than AMBS, Warwick, and even slightly higher than Imperial. Could you help me understand why is that so?&nbsp;
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brianna

Also, it's interesting to examine the assumption that you cannot afford a top MBA. Loans are available that will cover the full cost of attendance. As long as you are earning less than the average alumnus of the schools you can get into, then it's worth borrowing to get into a school with better outcomes. 

Forbes used to produce MBA rankings that focussed on the time it takes to get a return on investment. It's not a perfect method, and they had limited resources. So, they stopped the ranking. However, the 2019 results might give you some ideas:
https://www.businessbecause.com/news/mba-rankings/6377/forbes-mba-ranking-european-business-schools-offer-best-return-on-investment


Thank you for your advice on this. I always assumed that a student loan of huge amounts would be too much for me because I recently took out a pretty big loan for my business and that's been a pain, so to add student debt on top of that feels terrifying I'm not gonna lie. But Sir, I'm not sure I understood what you meant by "Loans are available that will cover the full cost of attendance. As long as you are earning less than the average alumnus of the schools you can get into, then it's worth borrowing to get into a school with better outcomes." Could you please explain this bit again?

[quote]Also, it's interesting to examine the assumption that you cannot afford a top MBA. Loans are available that will cover the full cost of attendance. As long as you are earning less than the average alumnus of the schools you can get into, then it's worth borrowing to get into a school with better outcomes.&nbsp;<br><br>Forbes used to produce MBA rankings that focussed on the time it takes to get a return on investment. It's not a perfect method, and they had limited resources. So, they stopped the ranking. However, the 2019 results might give you some ideas:<br>https://www.businessbecause.com/news/mba-rankings/6377/forbes-mba-ranking-european-business-schools-offer-best-return-on-investment [/quote]<br><br>Thank you for your advice on this. I always assumed that a student loan of huge amounts would be too much for me because I recently took out a pretty big loan for my business and that's been a pain, so to add student debt on top of that feels terrifying I'm not gonna lie. But Sir, I'm not sure I understood what you meant by "Loans are available that will cover the full cost of attendance. As long as you are earning less than the average alumnus of the schools you can get into, then it's worth borrowing to get into a school with better outcomes." Could you please explain this bit again?<div><br></div><div>
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Duncan

Loans are available that will cover the full cost of attendance. 
- You can borrow as much money as you need to pay for the course and cover your living costs. All top MBA programmes have arrangements with lenders. 

As long as you are earning less than the average alumnus of the schools you can get into, then it's worth borrowing to get into a school with better outcomes.
- Most people who attend a top MBA will more than double their income. Almost all will have a substantial increase in income. Are you earning less than the average MBA graduate at the schools mentioned in that Forbes article? If you are earning less, then an MBA will almost certainly be a good investment -- if you want an MBA level role. However, if you are earning more than the average graduate, or if you don't want to work in management, then perhaps a full-time MBA at these schools is not the right investment. 

[Edited by Duncan on Oct 17, 2022]

Loans are available that will cover the full cost of attendance.&nbsp;<br>- You can borrow as much money as you need to pay for the course and cover your living costs. All top MBA programmes have arrangements with lenders.&nbsp;<br><br>As long as you are earning less than the average alumnus of the schools you can get into, then it's worth borrowing to get into a school with better outcomes.<br>- Most people who attend a top MBA will more than double their income. Almost all will have a substantial increase in income. Are you earning less than the average MBA graduate at the schools mentioned in that Forbes article? If you are earning less, then an MBA will almost certainly be a good investment -- if you want an MBA level role. However, if you are earning more than the average graduate, or if you don't want to work in management, then perhaps a full-time MBA at these schools is not the right investment.&nbsp;
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Duncan

 I checked out the Hult website and found that their MBA program fee is GBP 64,000 which is a lot higher than AMBS, Warwick, and even slightly higher than Imperial. Could you help me understand why is that so? 


Although Hult is formally a non-profit, it is part of a voracious for-profit company, EF, and it pushes at the boundaries of what is acceptable for a business school. Hult is like a "half-price" Invicta watch on a TV shopping channel: no-one pays the full price. The feeling that you are getting a discount is part of what wins the buyers over. They are not selling to the best informed buyers. There are, as far as I can see, no circumstances where Hult is the best investment for you. Search the board for Hult. PS Am a Hult alumnus, through its takeover of Ashridge. 

[Edited by Duncan on Oct 17, 2022]

[quote]&nbsp;I checked out the Hult website and found that their MBA program fee is GBP 64,000 which is a lot higher than AMBS, Warwick, and even slightly higher than Imperial. Could you help me understand why is that so?&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br>Although Hult is formally a non-profit, it is part of a voracious for-profit company, EF, and it pushes at the boundaries of what is acceptable for a business school. Hult is like a "half-price" Invicta watch on a TV shopping channel: no-one pays the full price. The feeling that you are getting a discount is part of what wins the buyers over. They are not selling to the best informed buyers. There are, as far as I can see, no circumstances where Hult is the best investment for you. Search the board for Hult. PS Am a Hult alumnus, through its takeover of Ashridge.&nbsp;
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brianna

 I checked out the Hult website and found that their MBA program fee is GBP 64,000 which is a lot higher than AMBS, Warwick, and even slightly higher than Imperial. Could you help me understand why is that so? 


Although Hult is formally a non-profit, it is part of a voracious for-profit company, EF, and it pushes at the boundaries of what is acceptable for a business school. Hult is like a "half-price" Invicta watch on a TV shopping channel: no-one pays the full price. The feeling that you are getting a discount is part of what wins the buyers over. They are not selling to the best informed buyers. There are, as far as I can see, no circumstances where Hult is the best investment for you. Search the board for Hult. PS Am a Hult alumnus, through its takeover of Ashridge. 


I knew Hult was never a good choice, but seeing the school on the list of best schools for international students had me curious. My relatives who've done their MBA degrees outside the country have all attended schools like Hult, and I'm having a tough time explaining to my family why I don't want to go to another Hult. My GMAT scores aren't looking up and they don't want me to feel worse and stress out anymore, which is why they think I should target easy options. Anyways, got your point, and thank you, Sir. 

[quote][quote]&nbsp;I checked out the Hult website and found that their MBA program fee is GBP 64,000 which is a lot higher than AMBS, Warwick, and even slightly higher than Imperial. Could you help me understand why is that so?&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br>Although Hult is formally a non-profit, it is part of a voracious for-profit company, EF, and it pushes at the boundaries of what is acceptable for a business school. Hult is like a "half-price" Invicta watch on a TV shopping channel: no-one pays the full price. The feeling that you are getting a discount is part of what wins the buyers over. They are not selling to the best informed buyers. There are, as far as I can see, no circumstances where Hult is the best investment for you. Search the board for Hult. PS Am a Hult alumnus, through its takeover of Ashridge.&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br>I knew Hult was never a good choice, but seeing the school on the list of best schools for international students had me curious. My relatives who've done their MBA degrees outside the country have all attended schools like Hult, and I'm having a tough time explaining to my family why I don't want to go to another Hult. My GMAT scores aren't looking up and they don't want me to feel worse and stress out anymore, which is why they think I should target easy options. Anyways, got your point, and thank you, Sir.&nbsp;
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brianna

Loans are available that will cover the full cost of attendance. 
- You can borrow as much money as you need to pay for the course and cover your living costs. All top MBA programmes have arrangements with lenders. 

As long as you are earning less than the average alumnus of the schools you can get into, then it's worth borrowing to get into a school with better outcomes.
- Most people who attend a top MBA will more than double their income. Almost all will have a substantial increase in income. Are you earning less than the average MBA graduate at the schools mentioned in that Forbes article? If you are earning less, then an MBA will almost certainly be a good investment -- if you want an MBA level role. However, if you are earning more than the average graduate, or if you don't want to work in management, then perhaps a full-time MBA at these schools is not the right investment. 


It's clear now. Appreciate this very much! I want an MBA-level role, and I'm also currently earning less than the average MBA graduate from the schools in the Forbes article, so yes MBA is a good choice I believe. I should look at financial aid arrangements provided by schools. Before which I need to figure out which schools would be suitable for my profile. Sir, while you're here, could I ask you something? So, I sent my CV to AMBS for review - for the 2022 intake, and they got back to me saying I should work towards an MBA in a few years' time. I understand that means I'm not a fit for their MBA, but it's been a year since this and now if I were to put together a strong application, do you think I may stand a chance? I don't have a lot of significant achievements for the length of my career to date, and I believe that is why AMBS wasn't interested in my profile. But if that's really the case then I fear no school would consider me. I'm not sure what to do, to be honest. 

[quote]Loans are available that will cover the full cost of attendance.&nbsp;<br>- You can borrow as much money as you need to pay for the course and cover your living costs. All top MBA programmes have arrangements with lenders.&nbsp;<br><br>As long as you are earning less than the average alumnus of the schools you can get into, then it's worth borrowing to get into a school with better outcomes.<br>- Most people who attend a top MBA will more than double their income. Almost all will have a substantial increase in income. Are you earning less than the average MBA graduate at the schools mentioned in that Forbes article? If you are earning less, then an MBA will almost certainly be a good investment -- if you want an MBA level role. However, if you are earning more than the average graduate, or if you don't want to work in management, then perhaps a full-time MBA at these schools is not the right investment.&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br>It's clear now. Appreciate this very much! I want an MBA-level role, and I'm also currently earning less than the average MBA graduate from the schools in the Forbes article, so yes MBA is a good choice I believe. I should look at financial aid arrangements provided by schools. Before which I need to figure out which schools would be suitable for my profile. Sir, while you're here, could I ask you something? So, I sent my CV to AMBS for review - for the 2022 intake, and they got back to me saying I should work towards an MBA in a few years' time. I understand that means I'm not a fit for their MBA, but it's been a year since this and now if I were to put together a strong application, do you think I may stand a chance? I don't have a lot of significant achievements for the length of my career to date, and I believe that is why AMBS wasn't interested in my profile. But if that's really the case then I fear no school would consider me. I'm not sure what to do, to be honest.&nbsp;
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Duncan

Not knowing anything about your background, I have to assume that AMBS made a correct assessment and that the issue is not the content of your application but the quality of your work experience, personal mission and life outside work. An improved application in itself might not shift things if you don't have the quality they are looking for in their MBAs.

If you are ready for business school now, why not take a MiM or functional masters? Some schools, such as Strathclyde, allow MiM graduates (theirs is called an MBM) to upgrade to an MBA after a little more experience after graduating. 

Not knowing anything about your background, I have to assume that AMBS made a correct assessment and that the issue is not the content of your application but the quality of your work experience, personal mission and life outside work. An improved application in itself might not shift things if you don't have the quality they are looking for in their MBAs.<br><br>If you are ready for business school now, why not take a MiM or functional masters? Some schools, such as Strathclyde, allow MiM graduates (theirs is called an MBM) to upgrade to an MBA after a little more experience after graduating.&nbsp;
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brianna

I've been working for over four years now, and a few schools I reached out to, recommended an MBA over MiM. Like Essec, Edhec, and RSM. RSM was a dream school till I learned how important Dutch was. The number of years of my we could be why they asked me to look at their MBAs. And I guess I don't know how to evaluate myself because I thought there was no chance RSM would say I'm eligible to apply since AMBS didn't. I'm also leaning towards an MBA because I don't want to do an entry-level job.  
















I've been working for over four years now, and a few schools I reached out to, recommended an MBA over MiM. Like Essec, Edhec, and RSM. RSM was a dream school till I learned how important Dutch was. The number of years of my we could be why they asked me to look at their MBAs. And I guess I don't know how to evaluate myself because I thought there was no chance RSM would say I'm eligible to apply since AMBS didn't. I'm also leaning towards an MBA because I don't want to do an entry-level job.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>
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Duncan

It's the quality of your work experience that matters. Look at the profiles of people admitted to the programmes. They might have more experience managing people, money or information. They might have a clearer mission. They could have goals that relate more clearly to the specific employers that their school partners with. AMBS is a great school for career changers, and it's very focussed on help people who have the transferrable skills they need a clear goal. 

It's the quality of your work experience that matters. Look at the profiles of people admitted to the programmes. They might have more experience managing people, money or information. They might have a clearer mission. They could have goals that relate more clearly to the specific employers that their school partners with. AMBS is a great school for career changers, and it's very focussed on help people who have the transferrable skills they need a clear goal.&nbsp;
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