Studying in Munich - New European College?


Dear Duncan,

Please excuse my late reply - I did not receive an update that you replied to my post. Mea culpa - I should have checked earlier.

Concerning employability of non-EU NEC students (IUBH graduates), the following aspects need to be considered:

1. Non-EU students receive upon graduation an 18 month work seeking visa - this applies to all non-EU graduates in Germany. (www.goo.gl/AtlhMQ)

2. Munich has the lowest unemployment rate compared to Germany’s other major cities. (http://www.muenchen.de/rathaus/wirtschaft_en/munich-business-location/economic-data)

3. Munich has many multi-national corporations (Siemens, BMW, MAN, Amazon, Allianz, Microsoft, McDonalds and many more) and the demand for international graduates is strong.

4. IUBH has a very good reputation.

Summing up the above, the general environment for finding employment in Munich is very positive. Apart from the usual finding work challenges(your dream job is not available…), our students have not encountered any difficulties finding employment.

The official wording of our authorization:

It is assessed that the International University of Applied Sciences Bad Honnef(IUBH) is entitled to execute higher education courses and conduct university examinations in cooperation with New European College GmbH.

If you send me your e-mail address ([email protected]) I am more than happy to send you a copy of the official document.

IUBH is fully state recognized and New European College executes their course and exams. As we are only the teaching part and not the academic degree awarding institution we are not listed in the KMK or any other official list, it must be always be IUBH by law.

What we mean by core faculty is that these faculty members are the constant academic backbone of New European College. They fulfill the academic and professional requirements set and we consider them the to be our key asset. (As a business school we consider the academic requirements a pre-requisite, but our key focus is that the faculty members have real professional experience in the subjects they teach - this is what differentiates us from academic institutions in which lecturers only have an academic background. That is why we have linked from our website to the LinkedIn profile of those faculty members which have a profile - http://www.new-european-college.com/nec-faculty-selection/)

Please let me know if you have any further questions, in any case, I will now regularly check the discussion board.

Best Regards,
Sascha Liebhardt

Dear Duncan,

Please excuse my late reply - I did not receive an update that you replied to my post. Mea culpa - I should have checked earlier.

Concerning employability of non-EU NEC students (IUBH graduates), the following aspects need to be considered:

1. Non-EU students receive upon graduation an 18 month work seeking visa - this applies to all non-EU graduates in Germany. (www.goo.gl/AtlhMQ)

2. Munich has the lowest unemployment rate compared to Germany’s other major cities. (http://www.muenchen.de/rathaus/wirtschaft_en/munich-business-location/economic-data)

3. Munich has many multi-national corporations (Siemens, BMW, MAN, Amazon, Allianz, Microsoft, McDonalds and many more) and the demand for international graduates is strong.

4. IUBH has a very good reputation.

Summing up the above, the general environment for finding employment in Munich is very positive. Apart from the usual finding work challenges(your dream job is not available…), our students have not encountered any difficulties finding employment.

The official wording of our authorization:

It is assessed that the International University of Applied Sciences Bad Honnef(IUBH) is entitled to execute higher education courses and conduct university examinations in cooperation with New European College GmbH.

If you send me your e-mail address ([email protected]) I am more than happy to send you a copy of the official document.

IUBH is fully state recognized and New European College executes their course and exams. As we are only the teaching part and not the academic degree awarding institution we are not listed in the KMK or any other official list, it must be always be IUBH by law.

What we mean by core faculty is that these faculty members are the constant academic backbone of New European College. They fulfill the academic and professional requirements set and we consider them the to be our key asset. (As a business school we consider the academic requirements a pre-requisite, but our key focus is that the faculty members have real professional experience in the subjects they teach - this is what differentiates us from academic institutions in which lecturers only have an academic background. That is why we have linked from our website to the LinkedIn profile of those faculty members which have a profile - http://www.new-european-college.com/nec-faculty-selection/)

Please let me know if you have any further questions, in any case, I will now regularly check the discussion board.

Best Regards,
Sascha Liebhardt
quote
Duncan

Can you answer my original question: what percentage of non-EU students that are able to find work in Germany after graduating from IUBH at the NEC location?

I know that the employment scene is favourable in Munich and that most people in any country find work after masters degrees in any topic. But that does not mean that your non-EU students are finding work in Germany. A direct answer would be useful.

So "core faculty" just means the people who are teaching this year and who you want to return next year? Do you have any full-time, tenured academics?

PS I guess your reference to their professional activity means that they are generally not professional academics, but rather people who fit a small amount of teaching in around their professional priorities. Looking at the "core faculty" who seem to have doctorates, because of their pre or post-nominals academic titles, I see that your site links to their LinkedIn profiles: Barbara may have a diploma but not a masters or doctorate; Guillermo has ten current roles including 'guest' at NEC, so perhaps it's not a core task for him; Neither Korbinian nor Georg mention NEC on their profiles (and where is the 'University of Economics', which awarded his doctorate?). Only Anne-Marie seems to have NEC as her core role. So, you see, you use this term in a unique way to describe guests as core. I think that's important because students get access to people who centre their career on a school very different for those who pop in for one course.

[Edited by Duncan on May 12, 2016]

Can you answer my original question: what percentage of non-EU students that are able to find work in Germany after graduating from IUBH at the NEC location?

I know that the employment scene is favourable in Munich and that most people in any country find work after masters degrees in any topic. But that does not mean that your non-EU students are finding work in Germany. A direct answer would be useful.

So "core faculty" just means the people who are teaching this year and who you want to return next year? Do you have any full-time, tenured academics?

PS I guess your reference to their professional activity means that they are generally not professional academics, but rather people who fit a small amount of teaching in around their professional priorities. Looking at the "core faculty" who seem to have doctorates, because of their pre or post-nominals academic titles, I see that your site links to their LinkedIn profiles: Barbara may have a diploma but not a masters or doctorate; Guillermo has ten current roles including 'guest' at NEC, so perhaps it's not a core task for him; Neither Korbinian nor Georg mention NEC on their profiles (and where is the 'University of Economics', which awarded his doctorate?). Only Anne-Marie seems to have NEC as her core role. So, you see, you use this term in a unique way to describe guests as core. I think that's important because students get access to people who centre their career on a school very different for those who pop in for one course.
quote

Hello Duncan,

Of our current non-EU students 100% found a paid internship in under two months. As the first cohort of NEC students graduates on the 11th of June it is too early to give you exact figures. Taking into account what I wrote in my last post and that all our students have found an internship position it is viable to say that non-EU students will find employment in Munich - both bachelor and master.

On a side note - we actively support our students in finding employment. We have placed students in start-up companies (Kazakh student at ecozy.de), as well as in large corporations (Egyptian student at KPMG). We regularly host events together with business clubs (April - American German Business Club) or participate in fairs and conventions (February - ISPO and March - Expat Fair Munich) to create networking opportunities for our students.

Being the academic partner of IUBH we are not obliged to have full-time, tenured academics. We are in the favorable position that our faculty is made up of lecturers that teach what they do for a living. So the answer is no, we have no full-time, tenured faculty.

Please let me know if this answers your questions.

Hello Duncan,

Of our current non-EU students 100% found a paid internship in under two months. As the first cohort of NEC students graduates on the 11th of June it is too early to give you exact figures. Taking into account what I wrote in my last post and that all our students have found an internship position it is viable to say that non-EU students will find employment in Munich - both bachelor and master.

On a side note - we actively support our students in finding employment. We have placed students in start-up companies (Kazakh student at ecozy.de), as well as in large corporations (Egyptian student at KPMG). We regularly host events together with business clubs (April - American German Business Club) or participate in fairs and conventions (February - ISPO and March - Expat Fair Munich) to create networking opportunities for our students.

Being the academic partner of IUBH we are not obliged to have full-time, tenured academics. We are in the favorable position that our faculty is made up of lecturers that teach what they do for a living. So the answer is no, we have no full-time, tenured faculty.

Please let me know if this answers your questions.

quote
Duncan

Thanks Sacha (I added a PS while you were typing). That's good to hear. How many of these non-EU students are being paid for their internships at the level that would, in a full-time role, allow a visa to be issued?

Thanks Sacha (I added a PS while you were typing). That's good to hear. How many of these non-EU students are being paid for their internships at the level that would, in a full-time role, allow a visa to be issued?
quote

Duncan, thank you for asking. We pride ourselves with our faculty, so we do not 'advertise'.
But if someone asks, I am happy to brag.

Our recruiting philosophy is based on the following:
The business world is very competitive and as a business school we have to make sure that our students receive the most current education in order to secure their future competitive stand. In order to ensure that our students receive the most current education, we want a faculty that is exposed to the cold and competitive wind of the business world and by this bring their real life business experience into the classroom. This in combination with the academic models and theories taught are the fundament of a good business school.

From a meritocratic point of view (in the interest of the students), a full-time faculty member at a business school (this applies only to business school), has little incentive to outperform in comparison to a part-time faculty member that has to fear the loss of not getting hired again if they perform below expectations. Harsh but true, and also a solid guarantee that there is a genuine interest in the students.

Concerning the faculty members’ profiles on LinkedIn - we take no influence on the content of their profiles. In fact, we want this transparency as it underlines the authenticity of a business school.

(Barbara holds a DBA, post-graduate, from the University of Birmingham, Georg received his Ph.D. from the University of Economics Bratislava, Guillermo is a dedicated academic, filmmaker, author and entrepreneur, and I could tell you a long story about all our faculty members – as mentioned before they are our key asset.)

All our faculty is hand-selected based on the above mentioned and undergoes the following process:
1. Checking of documents of the applicant.
2. Interview with the President and Chancellor.
3. Test Lecture with President or Chancellor, a member of administration, a faculty member and a representative of the student body.

Should the lecturer receive the opportunity to lecture, evaluation by the students in the middle and end of the course. (Btw - all courses are anonymously evaluated by the students.)

Duncan, thank you for asking. We pride ourselves with our faculty, so we do not 'advertise'.
But if someone asks, I am happy to brag.

Our recruiting philosophy is based on the following:
The business world is very competitive and as a business school we have to make sure that our students receive the most current education in order to secure their future competitive stand. In order to ensure that our students receive the most current education, we want a faculty that is exposed to the cold and competitive wind of the business world and by this bring their real life business experience into the classroom. This in combination with the academic models and theories taught are the fundament of a good business school.

From a meritocratic point of view (in the interest of the students), a full-time faculty member at a business school (this applies only to business school), has little incentive to outperform in comparison to a part-time faculty member that has to fear the loss of not getting hired again if they perform below expectations. Harsh but true, and also a solid guarantee that there is a genuine interest in the students.

Concerning the faculty members’ profiles on LinkedIn - we take no influence on the content of their profiles. In fact, we want this transparency as it underlines the authenticity of a business school.

(Barbara holds a DBA, post-graduate, from the University of Birmingham, Georg received his Ph.D. from the University of Economics Bratislava, Guillermo is a dedicated academic, filmmaker, author and entrepreneur, and I could tell you a long story about all our faculty members – as mentioned before they are our key asset.)

All our faculty is hand-selected based on the above mentioned and undergoes the following process:
1. Checking of documents of the applicant.
2. Interview with the President and Chancellor.
3. Test Lecture with President or Chancellor, a member of administration, a faculty member and a representative of the student body.

Should the lecturer receive the opportunity to lecture, evaluation by the students in the middle and end of the course. (Btw - all courses are anonymously evaluated by the students.)
quote
Duncan

Any chance you'll answer my earlier question? How many of these non-EU students are being paid for their internships at the level that would, in a full-time role, allow a visa to be issued?

Just to be clear, since most people will understand DBA to be Doctor of Business Administration, Barbara's DBA is a diploma in business administration: that's a potential gateway to the MBA rather than a doctorate.

Any chance you'll answer my earlier question? How many of these non-EU students are being paid for their internships at the level that would, in a full-time role, allow a visa to be issued?

Just to be clear, since most people will understand DBA to be Doctor of Business Administration, Barbara's DBA is a diploma in business administration: that's a potential gateway to the MBA rather than a doctorate.
quote

Good Morning Duncan,

For the 18 month work seeking visa after graduating there is no minimum salary for non-EU students with a German university degree (BA & MA). So all internships salaries are above this. Upon your request, we went through the internship contracts the non-EU Bachelor students (Master students do not have mandatory internships) furnished us with and they range between €600 and €1400 per month.

For the work visa afterwards , the situation is a bit more complex - the minimum salary depends on the part of Germany they will be working in and the employment position the individual holds.

In Munich, highest cost of living of all major German cities, for a junior management position currently the minimum entrance salary is €2500. One of our Russian Bachelor students just applied for a work visa and the Munich immigration office defined this as minimum salary.

As I cannot give you for now exact data from us yet, I researched the average entrance salaries for management (Bachelor and Master) students in Germany. Depending on which report you look at, the entrance salary for Bachelor degrees in average ranges between € 34 000 and € 37 000 and for Master degrees between € 37 000 and € 41 000. In both cases, it will be sufficient to receive a work visa in Munich. (Please let me know if you want me to send you the links to the different reports - they are all in German.)

A good overview of the work and study visa requirements:
- http://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/EN/EinreiseUndAufenthalt/LernenUndArbeiten/ArbeiteninD_node.html

- http://www.expatica.com/de/visas-and-permits/Work-in-Germany-getting-a-German-work-visa_100900.html

Please let me know, if I can give you more information on general employability of non-EU students, as for the time being we still do not have data to share from our first cohort of graduating students.

Good Morning Duncan,

For the 18 month work seeking visa after graduating there is no minimum salary for non-EU students with a German university degree (BA & MA). So all internships salaries are above this. Upon your request, we went through the internship contracts the non-EU Bachelor students (Master students do not have mandatory internships) furnished us with and they range between €600 and €1400 per month.

For the work visa afterwards , the situation is a bit more complex - the minimum salary depends on the part of Germany they will be working in and the employment position the individual holds.

In Munich, highest cost of living of all major German cities, for a junior management position currently the minimum entrance salary is €2500. One of our Russian Bachelor students just applied for a work visa and the Munich immigration office defined this as minimum salary.

As I cannot give you for now exact data from us yet, I researched the average entrance salaries for management (Bachelor and Master) students in Germany. Depending on which report you look at, the entrance salary for Bachelor degrees in average ranges between € 34 000 and € 37 000 and for Master degrees between € 37 000 and € 41 000. In both cases, it will be sufficient to receive a work visa in Munich. (Please let me know if you want me to send you the links to the different reports - they are all in German.)

A good overview of the work and study visa requirements:
- http://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/EN/EinreiseUndAufenthalt/LernenUndArbeiten/ArbeiteninD_node.html

- http://www.expatica.com/de/visas-and-permits/Work-in-Germany-getting-a-German-work-visa_100900.html

Please let me know, if I can give you more information on general employability of non-EU students, as for the time being we still do not have data to share from our first cohort of graduating students.
quote

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